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Comparative Religion

Comparative religion is a field within religious studies that compares the history, themes, systems, myths and rituals of different religions. In the western world, the study of religion as distinct from theology is often rooted in the Enlightenment and the advent of Deism. Many of the Protestant theologians Dr. King studied shared an openness toward different cultures and religions. As a Christian theologian, King often engaged traditions other than his own. His interest in concepts of God, the topic of his dissertation, was not limited to Christian views. He learned from Jews, Hindus, Muslims and Buddhists and included some of those lessons in his speeches and writings. In Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? he wrote of love as “that force which all the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life.”

Associated Archive Content : 98 results

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes G. W. Knox on religion from the Harvard Theological Review.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason."

Religion (Its Inescapableness)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason" on religion as the "inescapable" bind between us and the universe.

Religion and Intelligence

Dr. King posits a theory on a battle between "semi-intelligent religion" and "irreligious intelligence."

Religion and Science

Dr. King writes about the different perspectives of the moralist and scientist, saying a person can be both.

Religious Witness For Human Dignity Booklet

Religious Witness for Human Dignity seeks the support of members of the Protestant, Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Jewish Communities in the struggle for civil rights.

Remember Who You Are!

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Resurrection

Dr. King paraphrases Karl Barth's description of the resurrection in "The Epistle to the Romans."

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Emil Brunner's "The Mediator."

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Schleiermacher & Ritschl

Dr. King writes notes regarding the philosophies of German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl. King states there is a mixture of attraction and repulsion between the two, as Ritschl is repelled by Schleiermacher's mysticism and attracted to his views on Christianity.

Schleiermacher (Relation of Morality to Religion)

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's view on the relation of morality to religion.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Outward Form)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion." The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Science and Religion

Dr. King wrote this essay while enrolled at Crozer Theological Seminary, circa 1948-1951. The thrust of Dr. King's stance is that "there never was a conflict between religion and science as such."

Science and Religion

Dr. King documents a quote regarding science and religion from "The Finding of God."

Sermon Notes: Christianity Explored

Dr. King discusses the various concepts of the religious body of Christianity. He specifically highlights the Christian perspective in relation to life, the Kingdom of God on Earth, and Jesus Christ.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Shattered Dreams

In a sermon entitled "Shattered Dreams", Dr. King opens with a passage from Romans 15:24. The Reverend continues with the expansion of hopes and the contrast of shattered dreams. Delivering this message from a theological vantage point, Dr. King closes with "Christian faith makes it possible for us nobly to accept that which cannot be changed, to meet disappointments and sorrow with an inner poise..."

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

The Christian Church and Communist Atheism

Helmut Gollwitzer, a Protestant theologian, completes this body of work entitled "The Christian Church and Communist Atheism." The author states that, "socialists may be Christians, but Christians must be socialists."

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

The False God of Science

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

The Montgomery Story

Dr. King delivers an address entitled the "Montgomery Story" at the NAACP 47th Annual Convention. He address several issues throughout the address including: segregation, civil rights, equality, slavery and religion.

The Practical Value of Religion

Dr. King writes about Albrecht Ritschl's views on the practical value of religion.

The Purpose of Religion

Dr. King argues that the purpose of religion is not to "perpetuate a dogma," but to create witnesses to the power of God. He also considers whether salvation comes from upholding a particular creed or whether it comes from an individual reconciling with God.

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