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Discrimination

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Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Lebbano and Mr. Mayle

Dr. King drafts a handwritten response letter. He informs the recipients of his pressing commitment to social justice.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Pickett

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Pickett's poem and some questions that she sent. He offers condolences for the loss of her husband and promises that the "redemptive suffering of few brings new life to many."

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Draft Speech for Atlanta Nobel Peace Prize Reception

Dr. King drafts a speech that he will make in Atlanta for the reception honoring his Nobel Peace Prize winning. In the speech he offers his gratitude to friends and family who supported him in his efforts. Dr. King also briefly discusses the issue of racial injustice and the continued fight for equality.

Economic and Social Bill of Rights

The SCLC calls for an economic and social bill of rights to demand the inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for African Americans. It would include the right of every employable citizen to a decent job, the right of every citizen to a minimum income, the right to a decent house in a neighborhood of choice, the right to an adequate education, the right to health care, and the right to full participation in decision-making.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Report

This report details a statistical count of Jewish communities being discriminated against according to a market research that was conducted by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Full Opportunity Act Summary

This summary outlines and provides the provisions of each section of the proposed Full Opportunity Act.

Fundraising Letter from MLK Addressed to Friends

Dr. King writes this letter on behalf of the Workers Defense League, requesting funds to assist six South African youth who seek political protection in the U.S.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

Goldwater's Nomination

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Gunnar Jahn's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Speech on MLK

Gunnar Jahn shares background information about Dr. King prior to presenting him the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. In his speech, Jahn informs the audience about the bus boycotts and the campaign for equality that Dr. King led. He also discusses Dr. and Mrs. King's choice to leave the easier life in the North to fight a racial battle in the South. Lastly he discusses Dr. King's dedication to his church and his faith in God.

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

Highlander Center Press Release

This press release details the Highlander Center, an adult education center for people who come to learn how to deal with problems affecting their lives and communities, which was under investigation. The investigation was being conducted to determine if the Highland Center was integrated as stated in its charter.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

House Illustrations by the Fair Housing Council in Greater Cleveland

African Americans face discrimination in several suburbs of Cleveland Ohio. The Fair housing Council developed to promote integrated housing options.

How Much Head Start for Mississippi's Children?

Kay Longcope describes the current status of the Child Development Group of Mississippi following the decision to pull funding for the program made by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

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