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Discrimination

Associated Archive Content : 607 results

Letter from Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs to SCLC

June Gordon, Executive Director of Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, encloses a check in the amount of $100. She also encloses material listing activities her organization has initiated.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

Letter from Esther M. Jackson to McGeorge Bundy

Esther Jackson, a professor at Shaw University, writes George Bundy of the Ford Foundation expressing his dismay in the support of a segregated theatre. Jackson also expresses his disappointment in Dr. King and Roy Wilkins for not recognizing the discrimination taking place in form of cultural separatism.

Letter from Eunice Janousek to MLK

Eunice Janousek requests that Dr. King review materials in the matter of the Blakey case with the hope that he can provide assistance to those who are being oppressed in South Dakota.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from G. P. Beckman to MLK

G. P. Beckman writes to Dr. King expressing his appreciation for people of similar faith. He asserts that he loves the black race as a whole and because of this love he does not want his children to grow up and experience similar persecutions.

Letter From George Patton Jr. to MLK

George Patton expresses his disdain to Dr. King about the names that whites call "Black Americans" and offers a list of names that blacks should be "referred to as."

Letter from Geraldine Jones to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Jones tells Dr. King about the heightened racial tension in Chicago, and her fear that Chicago will soon have a riot like Los Angeles.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

Letter from Harold W. Buchholz to MLK

Harold W. Buchholz, a financial patron, provides Dr. King with tips to appeal to more Americans regarding his programs to provide equality for Negroes.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Letter from Helen Marrow to MLK

Mrs. Marrow thanks Dr. King for his leadership and position on the Vietnam War. She also encloses a special composition dedicated to Dr. King for his commitment to peace.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Hersel Lillard to MLK

Lillard writes to Dr. King from the United States Public Health Service Hospital in Lexington Kentucky in hopes that Dr. King will help him because he feels the Court was prejudice against him. He hopes to prevent his injustice from happening to others in his situation. He also mentions two other men, Mulloy and Pratt, about to stand trial and in need of assistance.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King regarding certification from the SCLC and disagreements with the NAACP. He also seeks support from Dr. King to integrate the schools in Winston-Salem.

Letter from James A. Dombrowski Regarding S.C.E.F. Contribution

In this document, James A. Dombrowski, the Executive Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. requests a $10.00 contribution.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Letter from James Farmer to MLK

Chairman J. Farmer gives Dr. King a report from the National Advisory Committee of CORE.

Letter from James Lynwood Walker to MLK

James Lynwood Walker writes Dr. King about Muhammed Ali's refusal to join the army.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Jean Ward Wolff to MLK

Jean Ward Wolff expresses her concern about Dr. King turning his back on truth and justice in the form of supporting Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."

Letter From Jimmy Williams to MLK

Jimmy Williams, a U.S. Air Force officer, writes Dr. King requesting assistance in protesting his unjust termination from Officers Training School.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from John D. Silvera to MLK

John D. Silvera proposes several mass media initiatives to Dr. King. Attached to this letter is a memorandum with additional information.

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