Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Emancipation Proclamation

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation as an executive order on January 1, 1863, after the Confederate States of America did not respond to an ultimatum that they rejoin the Union. While stating that all slaves in ten rebellion states were free, it did not outlaw slavery, compensate the owners for their “property” or make the slaves citizens. It was not until passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1865 that slavery was outlawed, but the Emancipation Proclamation gave the Union troops the authority to free slaves in areas they occupied. On May 17, 1962, Dr. King delivered to the White House a document calling upon President Kennedy to mark the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation by signing an executive order outlawing segregation. That document is in this archive.

Associated Archive Content : 78 results

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King to request a transcript of his speech given during the March on Washington. Gertler also discusses a book by Henry Thoreau that is to be published in the near future.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech given during the March on Washington. Additionally Gertler requests speeches by Baynard Rustin and A. Philip Randolph. Gertler also mentions that he was present when Dr. King spoke in Montreal last year.

Letter from Melvin D. Kennedy to MLK

Melvin D. Kennedy, Editor at Morehouse College, writes Dr. King about the book, "Perspectives in Freedom and Progress, 1863-1963: An appraisal of the Negro's First Hundred Years of Freedom." He explains that the book is a non-profit venture that will add to the Negro narrative and highlight Negro accomplishments. He goes on to request that Dr. King contribute a chapter about the Negro's fight for freedom.

Letter from MLK to C. Anderson Davis

Dr. King replies to Reverend Davis' invitation to speak at the West Virginia Emancipation Proclamation Committee event in Bluefield, West Virginia. Dr. King declines the invitation citing his he has already accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements for the next ten to twelve months. Dr. King does extend his appreciation for the Committee's moral and financial support of the work done by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Stewart Udall

On behalf of the SCLC and affiliated organizations, Dr. King requests permission from Stewart Udall, United States Secretary of the Interior, to use the Lincoln Memorial for a Service of Dedication to celebrate the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from MLK to US Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall

Dr. King writes Stewart Udall, US Secretary of Interior, to thank him permitting the use of the Lincoln Memorial for the 100th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The event would come to be known as "The March on Washington," site of Dr. King's most famous speech.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Letter from Stewart Udall to MLK

Secretary Udall grants permission to the SCLC to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation at the Lincoln Memorial.

Letter from the Chester, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP to MLK

The Chester Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The organizers ask for information about the process to arrange the visit and for a picture to be enclosed with Dr. King's reply.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

MLK Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC

Dr. King, at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses numerous civil rights issues the organization is addressing throughout America.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Speech: Acceptance of Spingarn Medal

Dr. King addresses the attendees at the NAACP 48th Annual Convention in Detroit, Michigan. He acknowledges the noble men and women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott Movement, for which his leadership earned him this award. Dr. King also discusses the ongoing struggle for civil rights and the nonviolent approach needed for the American Negro to win freedom and justice.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

MLK's Interfaith Conference on Civil Rights Statement

Dr. King shares the significance of three major religious faiths of America, discussing the moral issues affiliated with segregation and the importance of the religious institutitions' influence.

More and Faster

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Negro Pioneers: Booker T. Washington

Lucille A. Chambers tells the story of Booker T. Washington's rise in society from his birth in Virginia to his founding of the Tuskegee Institute and the Negro Business League.

On Being A Good Neighbor

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

Pages