Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Emancipation Proclamation

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation as an executive order on January 1, 1863, after the Confederate States of America did not respond to an ultimatum that they rejoin the Union. While stating that all slaves in ten rebellion states were free, it did not outlaw slavery, compensate the owners for their “property” or make the slaves citizens. It was not until passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1865 that slavery was outlawed, but the Emancipation Proclamation gave the Union troops the authority to free slaves in areas they occupied. On May 17, 1962, Dr. King delivered to the White House a document calling upon President Kennedy to mark the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation by signing an executive order outlawing segregation. That document is in this archive.

Associated Archive Content : 78 results

Power Black or White and Christian Conscience

This document is an enclosure that belongs with a letter from Gayrund Wilmore, Isaiah Pogue, Leroy Patrick, Elder Hawkins, and Bryant George to MLK. The writers seek to raise the conscientiousness of Christians in both the black and white communities, and address an existing dilemma between race and power with the hope of bringing about reconciliation.

Revolution and Redemption

This document contains the address, "Revolution and Redemption," given by Dr. King in Amsterdam. Dr. King discusses the concerns of the "Gospel of Jesus Christ." He states there are two aspects of the world that must never be forgotten: "this is God's world," and that Jesus Christ gave his life for redemption.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Telegram from Rev. Enoch Jones to MLK

Reverend Enoch Jones informs Dr. King that the Baptist Minsters Conference of Nashville, Tennessee have selected Dr. King for their Emancipation Proclamation speaker. Reverend Jones provides information about the event in hopes that Dr. King will accept.

Text of Speech Delivered at Lincoln Memorial

This speech, given by Dr. King at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C, brings attention to the current state of oppression of Negro men and women in 1963.

The 105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation-Rev. C.L. Fullwood

Rev. C.L. Fullwood drafts a sermon to commemorate the "105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclimation for the Black People of America.:

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

The Luminous Promise

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Pages