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Ethics

Associated Archive Content : 145 results

Exodus

Dr. King wrote these note cards, marked "Class Notes," on Exodus. He focuses on the topics of knowledge, the doctrine of God, sin, ethics, social ethics, and the covenant.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Wrestle of Religion with Truth" on man's need to adjust himself to events.

God

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the ethics of God. According to the scriptures God is just and fair and demands "justice and sacrifice."

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah which demonstrates the eternalness and holiness of God.

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

God, Man, Sin, and Knowledge

Presented here is a series of notecards that defines an array of topics relating to philosophical and theological perspectives.

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

Immortality

Dr. King takes notes regarding immortality. In his notes, he references Johann Fichte's definition of ethics. He also discusses human duty as it relates to immortality.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

Jeremiah

In this series of ten notecards, Dr. King breaks down the Book of Jeremiah into mutiple sections, including chapters and versus regarding Good, knowledge, sin, and forgiveness.

Jesus' Ethical Character

Dr. King documents biblical passages that highlight Jesus' virtues.

Jesus: Humanity and Ethical Character

Dr. King lists verses from the New Testament on Jesus as an ethical character and man as sinner.

Kant

Dr. King outlines principles of Kantian philosophy regarding morality and religion.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes notes regarding Danish philosopher and theologian Doren Kierkegaard's views on ethics and religion.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

Letter from Ben-Zion Ilan to MLK

The American Representative of the General Federation of Labor in Israel writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize. He also reiterates a request for Dr. King to visit Israel as the guest of Histadrut, the Executive Director of the organization.

Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

Letter From George Patton Jr. to MLK

George Patton expresses his disdain to Dr. King about the names that whites call "Black Americans" and offers a list of names that blacks should be "referred to as."

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

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