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Ghettos

Associated Archive Content : 247 results

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

MLK on the New York Riots

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

MLK Press Conference Regarding Telegram to President Johnson

Dr. King discusses the social destruction of riots, the high rates of unemployment, and the importance of nonviolence.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

MLK Requests Contributions

Dr. King writes this fundraising letter on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains the campaigns taking place in Washington for the poor and urges immediate financial support for the struggle.

MLK Responds to Questions Pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement

Dr. King responds to a series of questions concerning such topics as his opposition to the Vietnam War, the direction of the Civil Rights Movement, urban riots in Detroit and Newark, and SCLC initiatives catered to the ghettos of the American South.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

MLK Statement Regarding Housing Proposal in Chicago

Robert Clifton Weaver, the first United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, encloses a statement made by Dr. King for Joseph Califano, assistant to President Johnson. Dr. King announces a slum area housing redevelopment project in the Chicago areas of Lawndale, East Garfield Park and Kenwood Oakland.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

My Dream

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

National Citizens' Commission Report to Congress

Urban Development Coordinator Shelby Southard, of the Cooperative League of the USA, sends Dr. King a copy of this report to Congress recommending improved foreign aid for urban development. Southard helped author the report, entitled the "National Citizens' Commission on Urban Development." It emphasizes unrest caused by "deplorable social conditions" in cities around the world, and seeks to improve urban development planning.

National Mobilization for the Freedom Budget

In a press release, Karen Kerpen announces the National Mobilization for the Freedom Budget. Groups from across the United States planned to convene in Washington D.C. to demand that Congress pass the Freedom Budget in order to assist those in need.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

News Article "Who Creates Slums?"

J. Frank Lindsey reports Mr. Hilliard's views about how slums are created. The reasons cited by Mr. Hilliard include undisciplined children and landlords who don't take care of their property.

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

News Release: $30 Billion Omnibus Bill for Jobs, Education and Housing Presented to SCLC Convention

This press release is an overview of Congressman John Conyers, Jr.'s "Full Opportunity Act of 1967."

Newspaper Article about MLK

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.

Nobel Lecture by MLK

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

North and South: SCLC Staff News January, 1967

The January, 1967 edition of SCLC's staff newsletter shares Christmas and New Year stories from the staff members and their families. The newsletter also reports on recent activities of the organization such as a Chicago boycott, Junius Griffin's move to the Republican National Committee, a political rally, the SCLC's housing project in Chicago, a recent conference on Negro history, the situation in Grenada, Mississippi and other news items.

Operation Breadbasket As Vision, Promise and Hope

This report discusses the socio-economic position of Negroes as it relates to education achievement, employment opportunities, and access to power and societal institutions.

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