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Human Rights

Associated Archive Content : 291 results

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.

Letter from William H. Booth to MLK

Commission on Human Rights Chairman William Booth invites Dr. King and a designated representative to a conference in New York entitled, "Testing Human Potential - New Techniques for Selecting Employees from Minority Groups."

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Letter to MLK from the Women For: Organization

The WOMEN FOR: organization sent Dr. King a letter with their enclosed policy regarding the conflict in Vietnam. Women For: is a non-partisan civic organization that is actively involved in local, national, and international affairs. The group of over 2,000 women believed, unanimously, that the United States should cease all military occupation.

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

This document is regarding the celebration of the Birthday Anniversary of the late Dr. King. The author states, "While the national holiday legislation is pending in Congress, masses of people everywhere already personally declare the date to be their own to honor one of history's greatest leaders."

Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

MLK Address to Southern Association of Political Scientists

Dr. King addresses the Southern Association of Political Scientists in November of 1964. This address consists of the accomplishments made because of the Civil Rights Movement and areas that society needs to improve upon.

MLK Addresses the National Association of the Bar

Dr. King seeks to gain support from legal practitioners by comparing the fight for legal rights of African Americans to the earlier fight for independence in which America took a stand against the forces of England.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

MLK honored; He sees Kinship in Civil Rights and Family Planning

Dr. King receives the first Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the National Conference. Dr. King states, "Negroes have a special and urgent concern with family planning as a profoundly important ingredient in their struggle for security and a decent life."

MLK in Memoriam

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

MLK Speech at NAACP Sponsored Rally for Civil Rights

Dr. King gives a speech in which he addresses a myriad of issues on the subject of civil rights.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

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