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I Have a Dream

Associated Archive Content : 71 results

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

A Christmas Sermon

Dr. King discusses the topics of peace, the state of mankind, and his vision for the future during the delivery of this sermon to the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.

Death of Dr. King

This photo was taken after Dr. King's assassination and contains slogans in support for the fallen leader.

Draft of I Have a Dream

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Elinor G. Galusha Request "I Have a Dream" by Dr. King 1966

This is letter from Elinor G. Glusha requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in book titled "Words of Faith".

I Have A Dream

This is an excerpt of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, as delivered at the March on Washington. The moderator asks Marion Anderson to sing, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

I Have A Dream

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Interview Outline for WAII-TV Show-Profile Emory University Atlanta, Georgia

This document outlines Dr. Edward T. Ladd's interview with Dr. King, for broadcast on WAII-TV's program "Profile Emory University."

Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Letter from Agnes Mack to MLK

Agnes Mack writes Dr. King to request a copy of his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. She also encourages him to continue in his efforts.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Letter from Cantor Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom writes to Miss McDonald requesting some of Dr. King's biographical material. Cantor Mendelson also informs her that he has met with Dr. King's attorney, Clarence Jones, to discuss the "I Have A Dream" as a "basis of a musical work."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul J. Dolan

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald grants Paul J. Dolan approval to use the "I Have A Dream" speech that Dr. King delivered at the March on Washington.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Solomon Mendelson

In this letter, Dora McDonald is responding to Solomon Mendelson. McDonald expresses her excitement that Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Letter from Frank Randolph Jr. to MLK

Frank Randolph highlights how Dr. King "brought to light" many things that were once unseen. Mr. Randolph writes this letter subsequent to the assassination of Dr. King and notes that he would like copies of the "I Have a Dream" speech. The writer is apparently unaware of Dr. King's death.

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to MLK

Music composer Irwin Heilner corresponds with Dr. King inquiring about the possibility of composing music and setting it to King's "I Have A Dream" speech.

Letter from Jim Vickrey to Thomas Offenburger

Jim Vickrey of Auburn University requests that Thomas Offenburger, Director of the SCLC Office of Public Relations, provides information regarding Dr. King's background.

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

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