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I Have a Dream

Associated Archive Content : 71 results

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1963

This issue of the SCLC Newsletter covers the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The publication features a number of photographs, editorials and the full text of Dr. King's Washington address.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

The Plain Dealer: Dr. King Here Today to Gauge Tensions

This article, printed in "The Plain Dealer," provides a brief history of Dr. King and details the plans he had for Cleveland, OH.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service Program outlines the events for September 11, 1966. Dr. King is the guest speaker to commemorate "the retirement of Rev. D. C. Rice from the pastorship of The Union Baptist Church."

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.

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