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Associated Archive Content : 15 results

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter requests the help of Dr. King in dealing with the Principal of W. J. Creel School, who is allegedly a racist and uses racial slurs against his students.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Letter from Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

The American Ambassador in Anman, Jordan encourages Dr. King to not reconsider his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Despite the turbulent political situation in the region, cancellation of the well-publicized trip would generate "distinct disadvantages" and much disappointment.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Theodore Smith

Mr. Wachtel informs Theodore Smith and Hosea Williams that they are in danger of breaking the terms of a loan agreement from The American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Nobel Lecture by MLK

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Overcoming an Inferiority Complex

The author writes about the psychological condition of an inferiority complex. He references present day college students and various historical figures that have all suffered from inferiority complexes.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

Statement by MLK

Dr. King warns the United States about the possibility of downfall should the federal government fail to change its policies. He sets a date for the SCLC to go to Washington D.C. and lead nonviolent demonstrations with the purpose of eradicating racism and poverty in America.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Lovie M. Lowe

Dr. King attempts to mediate between Mrs. Lowe and her pastor, the Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.