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Judaism

Associated Archive Content : 21 results

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

Antisemitism

An anonymous group issues a public statement addressing the rising issue of antisemitism throughout the world. According to the document, Soviet Jewry are facing "cultural extinction." As a result, Soviet relations have worsened in Israel. The group indicates that the policies of the U.S.S.R. have caused this wave of antisemitic discrimination and a nation-wide effort will have to help eradicate the movement.

Dr. Abernathy Selected for World Peace Mission

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces that Ralph D. Abernathy and his wife will embark on a world-wide mission for peace. Abernathy will serve as a delegate to the International Inter-religious Symposium on Peace.

Emancipation Proclamation Dinner Program

Dr. King speaks at a dinner engagement honoring the centennial anniversary of The Emancipation Proclamation.

How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

If I were a Negro

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Judaism

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding the distinction between Reform, Orthodox and Conservative Judaism.

Judaism

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to Pope Pius XII.

Judaism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Joseph Klausner's book "From Jesus to Paul" regarding Judaism. Joseph Klausner was a Jewish historian.

Judaism (View of Jesus)

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to the "Jewish Encyclopedia."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Letter from Samuel S. Backlar to MLK

Samuel S. Backlar, Chairman of the American Legion New York County Organization, writes Dr. King wishing him a "speedy recovery" and invites him to speak at Abraham Lincoln's 150th birthday celebration.

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Messianic Age

Dr. King reviews a bible verse that discusses the rule of the Messiah.

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.