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Labor Movement

Associated Archive Content : 79 results

A Look To The Future

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

A Tribute to the Organized Labor Movement

The Jewish Labor Committee extends heartfelt gratitude to the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) for twenty-five years of fraternal cooperation.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Annual Report by MLK

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Bold Design for a New South

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.

Chicago Freedom Rally

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

Cooperative Production System

G. C. Szmak provides information regarding the problems of labor management, as well as the causes and reasons for the degeneration of the wage compensation method.

Correspondence: Letter to Mr.Foner from Dr.King (Feb. 26, 1968)

Dr. King sends a contribution to Moe Foner to help in the efforts for peace in Vietnam.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

Letter and Article from D. Parke Gibson to MLK

D. Parke Gibson sends this article in Race Relations and Industry to Dr. King with the intention of including him in a future issue of the magazine. Those involved in the article agree that progress towards having minorities in leadership roles is on the rise, but not fast enough.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK Regarding Union Merger

Mr. Howard, Vice President of International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of negotiations for the merger of his organization's union and the United Steelworkers of America. If successful, this merger would strengthen the civil rights and labor movements in the South.

Letter from Bea Lazar to Dora McDonald

Bea Lazar thanks Miss McDonald for sending a copy of a recent speech given by Dr. King. She praises the speech as a lesson that Americans "sorely need." She also encloses a contribution to the SCLC as a Christmas present.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Letter from Curtis Harris to MLK

Curtis W. Harris, of the Virginia State Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, wrote to Dr. King to alert him that the Smithfield Packing Company has a labor situation very similar to that of Scripto in Atlanta. Harris explains that none of the senior Negro employees are in the appropriate income bracket and could use Dr. King's assistance.

Letter From Don Slaiman

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

Letter from James R. Hoffa to MLK

Teamsters President James (Jimmy) Hoffa requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the boycott in Alabama and how it relates to existing contractual agreements with interstate carriers.

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