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Labor Movement

Associated Archive Content : 79 results

Letter from Labor Union President Michael Quill to MLK

Michael Quill, International President of the Transport Workers Union of America, encloses a copy of their 11th Constitutional Convention minutes to Dr. King. He also thanks him for his words at their convention and his contribution to the labor movement in America.

Letter from MLK to Asbury Howard

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Howard for a recent letter which informed him of a proposed merger of labor unions.

Letter from MLK to Blaine Marrin

Dr. King thanks Blaine Marrin and the local 157 UAW members for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the relationship between the labor and civil rights movements. He also discusses the financial needs of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Letter from MLK to James Hoffa

Dr. King offers support to James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, several months prior to the start of Mr. Hoffa's prison term at Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary in Pennsylvania.

Letter from MLK to Sargent Shriver

This letter to Sargent Shriver provides details about the SCLC's 1965 Annual Convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King also extends an invitation for Mr. Shriver to open the conference with an address about poverty, unemployment, and urban migration.

Letter from MLK to Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa

Dr. King thanks James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, for his organization's $25,000 contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current works and beliefs of the SCLC and also stresses the importance of supporters like the Teamsters.

Letter from MLK to Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa

Dr. King thanks famous Teamsters President James Hoffa for their contribution of $25,000 to aid the SCLC. According to Dr. King, Hoffa and the Teamster's contribution will increase voter registration and economic development that will narrow the divide between whites and Negroes.

Letter from Moe Foner to a Friend

Moe Foner is writing in regards to a new publication called, "Labor Voice For Peace." The issue mentioned covers the conference of labor leaders held in Chicago. Foner also asked for any comments concerning the publication.

Letter from Mr. David Winder to MLK

Mr. David Winder writes Dr. King in an attempt to gain an interview during one of Dr. King's upcoming visits to New York.

Letter from Ms. Bernice Gutman to The Public Review Advisory Commission

This document is a letter to the Public Review Advisory Commission from a union concerning a scholarship and additional information for applicants.

Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Ted Bleecker to MLK

Ted Bleecker, Director of Publications for the United Federation of Teachers, extends gratitude to Dr. King for his statement in the Federation's 50th anniversary issue. Enclosed is a copy of the issue in which Dr. King congratulates the Federation, draws comparisons between the attitudes of the Federation and the Civil Rights Movement, and thanks them for receipt of the John Dewey Award.

Letter from Walter Simcich to MLK

The International Woodworkers of America invites Dr. King to speak at its biennial convention in Toronto. Additionally, Mr. Simcich extends an invitation to speak at the British Columbia Federation of Labour's convention in Vancouver.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

MLK Addresses the District 65 AFL-CIO

This is an address given by Dr. King to District 65 of the National AFL-CIO Convention in Miami, Beach. Dr. King recognizes their contribution to the Southern Christen Leadership Conference.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

MLK Statement in Support of Labor Union

This 1959 statement on behalf of the United Packing House Workers Union is one of many Dr. King wrote supporting unions and the Labor Movement.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

News from the AFL-CIO: Labor News Conference

AFL-CIO's public affairs program, the Labor News Conference. Donald Slaiman, Director of the AFL-CIO's Department of Civil Rights was questioned by Alan Adams of Business Week Magazine and Stanley Leward of Scripps-Howard Newspapers. The three have a discussion about apprenticeship opportunities for minority youths, particularly of Negro and Puerto Rican heritage.

News from the American Jewish Committee

This news release announces that John Gardner, former Secretary of Health (among other positions) accepted the head position of the Urban Coalition, a campaign that combats urban poverty.

No More Negro Cop Restrictions Asked

These newspaper clippings feature a photo and caption of Atlanta Police Chief Herbert Jenkins regarding the lifting of restrictions on Negro policemen arresting white persons, and an article on alleged violent tactics by a labor union.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Poster: This Store Is Against Equal Opportunities for Negroes

The SCLC placed this type of boycott poster on the storefronts of businesses that refused to provide equal job opportunities to Negroes.

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