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March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 1963

Associated Archive Content : 160 results

Information about Poor People's Campaign

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Interview Outline for WAII-TV Show-Profile Emory University Atlanta, Georgia

This document outlines Dr. Edward T. Ladd's interview with Dr. King, for broadcast on WAII-TV's program "Profile Emory University."

Invitation from Earl S. Smith to MLK

Earl S. Smith invites Dr. King to speak at Montevideo, Uruguay on the methods of nonviolence in Latin America.

Invitation from Frederick S. Wallin to MLK

Frederick E. Wallin invites Dr. King to speak at the Alderson-Broaddus College's Civic Interest Week, a weeklong study and discussion on political and economic concerns. He explains that he is inviting the most controversy speakers would seriously appreciated Dr. King's attendance.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.

Letter from Agnes Mack to MLK

Agnes Mack writes Dr. King to request a copy of his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. She also encourages him to continue in his efforts.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

Letter from Benjamin Conklin to Rev. Abernathy

Mr. Conklin writes this letter urging Rev. Abernathy to rethink the decision to proceed with the Peoples March on Washington. He is concerned that with the recent assassination of Dr. King this action will only alienate Congress and the American public. Hence the march could cause more bloodshed.

Letter from Carleton L. Spier to MLK

Spier shares his disapproval of Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell and his concern regarding Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Letter From Chas D. Wherry to MLK

Chas Wherry advises Dr. King to consult with Dr. H. H. Brookins about accumulating more funds for the March on Washington. Wherry also inquires about Dr. King sending a letter to the Los Angeles Times regarding Mrs. Bain's newly appointed position.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Letter from Dottie Hughes to Dr. and Mrs. King

Mrs. Hughes, a resident of Zambia, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She informs Dr. and Mrs. King that their efforts are being recognized in Africa.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Letter from Edward McGaughy to MLK

Edward McGaughy writes to Dr. King suggesting a "Christmas for Human Rights." The writer highlights a strategy to help make it possible for families in need to receive aid.

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Helen Paul to Dora McDonald

Helen Paul of Follett Publishing thanks Ms. McDonald for informing Dr. King of her request to publish several of his speeches.

Letter from James Marley to MLK

James Marley, Secretary and Treasurer of the Hotel and Club Employees Union Local 6, encloses a contribution to the SCLC "to aid [with] the great task to obtain equality for all Americans."

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes to Dr. King regarding his "I Have A Dream" speech.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, suggests a discussion concerning future writing plans. She mentions the possibility of publishing a collection that would include several of Dr. King's speeches and writings, among them the March on Washington address and the Oslo speech.

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