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March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, 1963

Associated Archive Content : 160 results

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from John Saunders to MLK

A supporter from D.C. writes Dr. King to ask if he can work for him in the "coming campaign".

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech given during the March on Washington. Additionally Gertler requests speeches by Baynard Rustin and A. Philip Randolph. Gertler also mentions that he was present when Dr. King spoke in Montreal last year.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King to request a transcript of his speech given during the March on Washington. Gertler also discusses a book by Henry Thoreau that is to be published in the near future.

Letter from MLK to Abby Seldes

Dr. King dictates a response letter to Miss Abby Seldes expressing his heartwarming appreciation to the young lady. He also expresses gratitude towards Abby's parents for attending the March On Washington demonstration.

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Goodwin

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's request for Mr. Daniel Goodwin to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms.

Letter from MLK to Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre

Dr. King writes Elsa McIntyre thanking her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He also informs her of how her contribution will aid in the organization's work to fight discrimination.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Myles Campbell

Dr. King expresses his thanks to Mrs. Myles Campbell for the kind response to his "I Have A Dream" speech during the March on Washington. He explains that prayer is needed for those who are unable to see past their own prejudices and acknowledge everyone as God's children. Dr. King asserts that the federal government is needed to change behaviors in the south and send Mrs. Campbell season's greetings.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

Letter from MLK to US Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall

Dr. King writes Stewart Udall, US Secretary of Interior, to thank him permitting the use of the Lincoln Memorial for the 100th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The event would come to be known as "The March on Washington," site of Dr. King's most famous speech.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mr. Ossie Davis to MLK

Mr. Ossie Davis suggests to Dr. King that a tribute be prepared to honor the life of Dr. W. E. B. DuBois. Mr. Davis then asks Dr. King for his assistance in gaining sponsorship from "distinguished men and women."

Letter from Mr. William A. Linsley to MLK

This document features a faculty member from the University of Houston conferring with Dr. King on "I Have a Dream" materials to be used for his students' curriculum.

Letter from Mrs. Weitzler to Bayard Rustin

Mrs. Weitzler assesses the meaning of the "March on Washington" and the impact it has had on her.

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Letter from Peggy Seldes to MLK

Peggy Seldes thanks Dr. King for responding to her daughter's previous letter. Peggy goes on to praise Dr. King for his I Have A Dream speech given during the March On Washington of August 28, 1963.

Letter from Philip Foubert to Joan Daves

This letter dated November 28, 1964, was sent to Joan Daves from Philip Foubert. Foubert, editor of ECHO at Seattle Prep, writes to Joan Daves requesting that Dr. King write a "short letter, suitable for publication in our yearbook and addressed to the students of Seattle Prep."

Letter from Reverend Casper Glenn to MLK

Rev. Casper Glenn, president of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, writes to Dr. King regarding rights to a recording of the "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter From Supporter on Jobs for the Poor

The author and the addressee of this correspondence is unknown. However, the subject matter is related to the SCLC 1968 Poor Peoples Campaign. The author of this letter requested assistance in helping the poor people of Baltimore, Maryland apply for employment.

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