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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Friends and Associates

Associated Archive Content : 304 results

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Cass Canfield informs Dr. King that his company, Harper & Row Publishers Inc., won't publish Dr. Benjamin E Mays' book of memoirs.

Letter from Clarence D. Coleman to MLK

Director of the Southern Region of the National Urban League, Clarence D. Coleman, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the 1964 Nobel Piece Prize. Coleman extends his very best wishes to Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of the staff of the Southern Regional Office of the National Urban League and the officers and members of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Benjamin E. Mays that Dr. King will attend the Morehouse Board of Trustees luncheon.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jessie Stephens

Miss McDonald informs Jessie Stephens that Dr. King is out of the country, but she recommends that Mrs. Stephens contact Dr. King's lawyer, Chauncey Eskridge, for help.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Otis Moss

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Otis Moss, Dr. King's former co-pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church, that Dr. King will not be able to accept his invitation to speak at Mt. Zion Baptist Church for Men's Day due to his travels.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from Emily A. Fortson to MLK

Ms. Fortson requests Dr. King contact her immediately regarding a press release to announce his upcoming pilgrimage. She informs Dr. King that both Jews and Arabs have shown "intense interest" in the trip.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Letter from Frank Clarke to MLK

Frank Clarke requests a letter of recommendation from Dr. King. Mr. Clarke seeks to obtain the position of the Assistant Press Secretary to the President.

Letter from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Rev. Gardner C. Taylor sends a financial contribution to the SCLC on behalf of the Progressive National Baptist Convention.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.

Letter from Harris Wofford to MLK and Ralph Abernathy

Harris Wofford, civil rights supporter and friend of Dr. King, proposes "the right next step" for King and the Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests round-table conferences composed of white and Negro ministers, an idea inspired by the efforts of Gandhi.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Letter from Harry Denman to Billy Graham and MLK

Harry Denman, an evangelist at the Methodist Church in Nashville, Tennessee, writes to Dr. King and Dr. Billy Graham in the hope that they will appear together for eight consecutive nights on a television program to be broadcast nationally and themed "God's Society."

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Mr. Wachtel, Dr. King's legal counsel, provides an update on pending matters regarding the American Foundation of Non-Violence.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

Letter from Henderson Travel Service, Inc. to Dora McDonald

Freddye Henderson of Henderson Travel Service, Inc. informs Miss McDonald of the total cost for the group's trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Henry N. Flynt, Jr. to MLK

Henry N. Flynt expresses his appreciation for a copy of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here" and compliments Dr. King on the quality of the book.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Letter from Honi Coles, Jackie Robinson and Arthur Logan to MLK

Dr. King is informed of an event honoring Frank C. Schiffman, Director of the Apollo Theater, for his support of Negro entertainers and for providing jobs in the Harlem community. The gentlemen also present the SCLC a check for $5,500, which they hope will be used to purchase vehicles for the SCLC Freedom Fleet.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

In this letter, Vice President Humphrey extends a holiday greeting to Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK with Concerns of Supporting SCLC

Sandperl pleas with Dr. King to review and respond to his four point proposal, proclaiming that only then will he and Joan Baez continue to support SCLC. Sandperl criticizes SCLC for not being honest with it's coworkers, being unorganized, and self defeating. Sandperl wants Dr. King to convince him otherwise, but does not view the SCLC as being able to achieve social change from what he experienced at the retreat in South Carolina. Sandperl promises support if his proposal is adopted by the SCLC.

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

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