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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Health

Associated Archive Content : 46 results

Acknowledgement of Condolences

A standard form of an acknowledgment response, in reference to the receipt of condolences, is highlighted in this document.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Card from Joyce Anderson to MLK

Joyce Anderson sends Dr. King a "get well" card with a note of encouragement after he was stabbed by a woman in Harlem, New York.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Get well letter from Nicholas Altomerianos to MLK

Nicholas Altomerianos, Mayor of Charles Evan Hughes High School in New York, sent Dr. King this get well letter on behalf of its faculty and students.

Get Well Message to MLK from the Anderson Family

The Anderson family wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery and informs him of a recent meeting with Rev. Kelley.

Letter from Andrew Hobart to MLK

In this letter, dated 11/29/66, Mr. Andrew Hobart, President of Ministers Life and Casualty Union informs Dr. King that his application for reinstatement has been accepted, and cautions a lapsed contract may result in a loss or reduction of benefits.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Pearl Goodwin

In response to a previous request, Dora McDonald informs Pearl Goodwin that Dr. King will be unable to provide a commentary for her book "A Book of Commentary." She mentions that the request cannot be fulfilled due to Dr. King's chaotic speaking schedule.

Letter from Dr. King's Secretary, Maude L. Ballou

In this standard response letter, Dr. King's personal secretary highlighted the progress made in his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem. It also notes that Dr. King would respond to his many "well wishes", once he had been cleared by his physicians.

Letter from J. DeWitt Fox to MLK Regarding Smoking

In this letter, Mr. Fox writes to Dr. King requesting a picture, a biographical sketch, and a brief statement promoting good health amongst teenagers while also discouraging smoking. Mr. Fox would like to include Dr. King’s statement in the book “Why Not Smoke.”

Letter from John A. McDermott to MLK

Mr. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, thanks Dr. King for speaking at a recent special membership meeting even though Dr. King was not feeling well at the time.

Letter from John H. Britton, Jr. to MLK about a Photograph

In this letter John H. Britton, Jr., managing editor of JET, encloses a copy of a photograph of Dr. King reading a novel, "The Prize," in a hospital bed. The photograph was sent to Dr. King after the author of the novel, Irving Wallace, also requested a copy.

Letter from Loretta Abbott to MLK

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Rev. J. Martin England

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Rev. England that Dr.King spent a few days in the hospital. She asks for Rev. England to send the insurance forms for Dr.King to complete.

Letter from MLK to Dr. & Mrs. Bacon

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. and Mrs. Bacon for their kind donation of $200 sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Letter from MLK to Dr. L. K. Jackson

Dr. King regretfully informs Dr. L. K. Jackson that the Sunday he wants to preach at Ebenezer is one of the three Sundays that he is obliged to preach. Dr. King states the he knows Pastor Jackson understands his schedule and he would love to have him speak at his church in the future. Dr. King connects Pastor Jackson to Reverend Abernathy so that he can preach at his church.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. C. Williams

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy C. Williams for his hospitality during his visit to Denver and for raising funds for the SCLC.

Letter from R. Abraham to MLK

R. Abraham sends this get-well letter to Dr. King wishing a full recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital. Also enclosed is a gift in appreciation for Dr. King's work for humanity.

Letter from Robert Bartlett to MLK

The minister of the First Congregational Church sends encouraging words to Dr. King after his attack in Harlem, New York.

Letter from Samuel S. Backlar to MLK

Samuel S. Backlar, Chairman of the American Legion New York County Organization, writes Dr. King wishing him a "speedy recovery" and invites him to speak at Abraham Lincoln's 150th birthday celebration.

Letter from Vivian Washington to MLK

Vivian E. Washington requests that Dr. King, who is recovering in a Harlem Hospital, review her publication "Mount Ascutney" and provide her with feedback.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

Letter to MLK Regarding Support and Donation

A New York couple and their 9 year old son, mailed Dr. King this get well letter praying for his recovery and saluting him for his work.

Medical Order for MLK

During a private medical visit at St. Joseph Hospital, Dr. James D. Palmer documents a list of orders to be administered to Dr. King.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Miss Dora McDonald provides Dr. King with a synopsis of updates regarding invitations and correspondences. She notifies Dr. King of the Ann Morris School of Arts attendance at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Eugene Carson Blake's response to Dr. King's acceptance to speak, and V. M. Herron requests of 300 "Black is Beautiful" pamphlets. In addition, she informs Dr. King of the recent telephone calls from various individuals.

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