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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Interpretations

Associated Archive Content : 257 results

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.

Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

Letter from Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis to MLK

Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis invite Dr. King to speak to the students at University of Oregon.

Letter from Victoria Bellard to MLK

Bellard invites Dr. King to speak on behalf of voting rights and awareness. The event will host members of The Cordelia Green Johnson Beauty Forum. This displays the level of concern at the grassroots.

Letter from William A. Lawson to MLK

William A. Lawson extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to an assembly at Texas Southern University.

Letter to MLK

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Letter to MLK from the Peace Research Institute

The Peace Research Institute of Oslo congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and further expresses their interest of having Dr. King speak at a seminar on nonviolence. The institute is starting a research project on nonviolence with a focus on observing inter-group conflicts.

Liberal Theology

Dr. King paraphrases [Theodore G.] Soares on the religious liberal.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Love of God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah referencing God's goal to redeem all mankind.

Man

Dr. King interprets Psalm 90, which he explains discusses the transience of man as compared to God.

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Man

Dr. King references two quotations on a note card titled "Man."

Man

Dr. King quotes Nobel Literature Prize winner William Faulkner on the prospects for man.

Man

Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

Man (Hamlet)

Dr. King quotes from the Shakespearean play.

Man (sinfulness)

Dr. King explains the sinfulness of man with a quote from the book of Psalms.

Manichaeism

Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Mastering Our Fears

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

Messianic Age (Haggai)

Dr. King makes reference to the Biblical governor Zerubbabel. The specific passage to which Dr. King refers reads, "On that day, says the Lord of Hosts, I will take you Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, my servant, and wear you like a signet ring; for it is you whom I have chosen. This is the word of the Lord of Hosts" (Hag. 2:23).

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes from F. H. Bradley's "Appearance and Reality."

Miracle

Dr. King references the Old Testament Biblical Book of Numbers regarding the topic of miracles.

Miracles

Dr. King paraphrases the Old Testament scripture of Exodus chapter 13, verse 22, in which God leads the Israelites with a cloud by day and a a pillar of fire by night.

MLK Draft - The Weakness of Liberal Theology

Dr. King analyzes the problems associated with liberal theology. According to his view, liberal theology, "seems to be too divorced from life."

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

MLK Draft: Man's Extensions

Dr. King describes how man has invented tools to extend his knowledge: the telescope for his eyes, the microphone and radio for his ears, and the airplane and automobile for his legs.

MLK Letter re Harvey Cox Book

Dr. King drafts a response to a request for permission to be quoted in Rev. Cox's book, God's Revolution and Man's Responsibility.

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

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