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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Public Speaking

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1967 Geneva Convocation

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

A Knock at Midnight

Dr. King wrote this sermon for the Youth Sunday Services of the Women's Convention Auxiliary National Baptist Convention in Chicago on September 14, 1958. The sermon builds off of a biblical passage from Luke in which a friend visits a neighbor at midnight for three loaves of bread. Correlating the story to the modern world, Dr.

A Look to the Future

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

A Religion of Doing

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

All Local 1 Members Invited

All Local 1 members are invited to hear Dr. King discussing the intricacies of "The Summer Project."

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Public Meeting

Dr. King is listed as the keynote speaker for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Forty-First Boule on August 10, 1964.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

An Invitation to a Dedication by Olivet and Her Friends

Olivet Institutional Baptist Church sponsors a month long dedication to the opening of the O. M. Hoover Christian Community Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. King is listed as a participant in the dedication.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Another Opinion: I Oppose the War in Vietnam

This column contains excerpts from an address given by Dr. King in Chicago, in which he expresses his concerns regarding the Vietnam War and how it will affect poverty in America.

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Catholics Involved in Integration

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Central Methodist Church Program

Dr. King speaks at the Central Methodist Church after a Sunday service regarding the work that he has done for the community.

Christian Responsibility in a Nuclear Space Age

The Church Federation of Los Angeles conducted the Christian Responsibility in a Nuclear Space Age Seminar, for which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

Church Program of the Installation of Rev. A. D. Williams King

This program details the installation services of Reverend A. D. Williams King at The First Baptist Church of Ensley, Alabama. A number of community and church leaders, including his older brother, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Ralph Abernathy, welcome the young pastor and his family to his new pastorate position.

Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood, Inc. Program

The Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood organized this program where Dr. King makes a special address.

City Wide Freedom Rally Featuring MLK

This 1964 program from a rally in Canton, Ohio, features Dr. King as speaker.

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.

Commentary on MLK Article

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.

Community Service Committee Presents MLK

The Community Service Committee of Oakwood College presents Dr. King as its guest speaker in an upcoming event.

Confidential Memorandum

This handwritten document outlines plans for the SCLC's Direct Action program. The program will target Birmingham, Alabama, Montgomery, Alabama and Danville, Virginia.

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