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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Religion

Associated Archive Content : 445 results

A Christmas Sermon

Dr. King discusses the topics of peace, the state of mankind, and his vision for the future during the delivery of this sermon to the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

A Knock at Midnight

Dr. King wrote this sermon for the Youth Sunday Services of the Women's Convention Auxiliary National Baptist Convention in Chicago on September 14, 1958. The sermon builds off of a biblical passage from Luke in which a friend visits a neighbor at midnight for three loaves of bread. Correlating the story to the modern world, Dr.

A Religion of Doing

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Abstract of MLK's Dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman"

Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s abstract of his doctoral dissertation in Systematic Theology at Boston University details the fundamental problem of evaluating the concept of God in the philosophical and theological thoughts of Paul Tillich and Nelson Wieman; methods of procedure implemented throughout his research; and his conclusions drawn from the teachings of Tillich and Wieman.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

Anabaptists

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Angels

Dr. King writes on angels, according to Daniel 10:13, 21, and 12:1.

Angels

Dr. King mentions the concept of patron angels that appears in Daniel 10:13, 20, and 21.

Anglicanism

This note card briefly compares Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

Bible

Dr. King quotes John Ruskin and Thomas Carlyle on the significance of the Bible.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Brunner & Niebuhr

Dr. King relates Swiss theologian Emil Brunner to American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, in that they both argue that reason is for adjusting to the material world, and faith is for dealing with God.

Buddhism

Dr. King quotes James Bissett Pratt's "The Religious Consciousness: A Psychological Study."

Chapter 1 - Introduction

In this dissertation, Dr. King discusses several investigations and problems. He centers the paper around a comparison of "the conceptions of God in the thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Christ

Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

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