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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Religion

Associated Archive Content : 445 results

Letter from David Ben-Gurion to MLK

Mr. Ben-Gurion, founder and first prime minister of Israel, congratulates Dr. King on his decision to lead a mass pilgrimage to Israel and Jordan. He also informs King that he is planning a trip to the US and looks forward to the opportunity of meeting in person. The pilgrimage, scheduled for November 1967, did not take place because of the Six Day Arab-Israeli War that June.

Letter From David Fishman to MLK

Mr. Fishman, a disciple of Robert Ingersoll, praises Dr. King for a lecture he delivered at Orchestra Hall in Chicago Illinois. He concludes by comparing his personal religious beliefs to common pedagogy.

Letter from Donald Lincoln Cook to MLK

Donald Cook lauds Dr. King's efforts to persuade military forces to leave Vietnam. In response to a speech on Vietnam given by Dr. King, Cook agrees that "the Negro should have special interest in the plight of the Vietnamese." He further encourages Dr. King to stand firm in his position to bring a moral conscience to the nation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to J. Sackmann

Ms. McDonald invites Sackmann's students on behalf of Dr. King to visit his office and speak with his executives.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Letter from Douglas Straton to MLK

Douglas Straton, Chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Oregon, invites Dr. King to participate in their Distinguished Visiting Lectureship Program. The department would appreciate Dr. King's presentation of three lectures and attendance at a breakfast meeting with the town clergy. They offer him a $500 honorarium and request that he consider coming the following school year.

Letter from Dr. D. F. Harris to MLK

Dr. D. F. Harris asks Dr. King if he can participate in the upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He gives Dr. King the names of people who can be contacted for information about his background, including Dr. Milton Reid, pastor of the New Calvary Baptist Church in Norfolk, Virginia.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Letter from Gerald H. Anderson to MLK

Gerald Anderson, the Academic Dean at Union Theolgical Seminary, writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to a volume of sermons for publishing.

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Letter from Henry Lee Gibson to MLK

Henry J. Gibson is aware of Dr. King's understanding of "God" and spirituality. Subsequent to a recent surgery, Mr. Gibson is now conscious of the meaning of being "born again." Praying enhanced his knowledge of God's presence in the human race which brought clarity for his perception of the "yellow man." Mr. Gibson requests to meet with Dr. King to further discuss his recent spiritual experiences and newly found wisdom.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Letter from Lyman Cady to MLK

Lyman Cady, of Westminister Presbyterian Church, expresses his support for Dr. King's recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" He also commends Dr. King's overall leadership throughout the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to AJ Muste

After considerable thought and prayer, Dr. King informs the recipients of this letter of his decision to travel to the Soviet Union under the sponsorship of the American Baptist Convention. He conveys his sense of duty as a Negro leader to speak to Baptists in Russia.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Phale D. Hale

Dr. King congratulates Rev. Hale on Union Grove Baptist Church's 75th Anniversary.

Letter from Moisa Bulboaca to MLK

Moisa Bulboaca thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence in which Dr. King expressed his interest in visiting and preaching in Romania. In the event Dr. King actually formulates a trip, Bulboaca suggests accompanying if possible. The author explains their background in "sacred music" and provides a brief biography for consideration. They offer to organize a musical selection to fit Dr. King's sermons.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Letter from Pastor F. Peter Sabey to MLK

Pastor F. Peter Sabey of the Lafayette College Church invites Dr. King to give a sermon at the church. Sabey states that he will cover the expenses for Dr. King and give an honorarium if he accepts.

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

Letter from Paul Stagg to MLK

Paul Stagg, Program Director of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, invites Dr. King to attend their convention along with a delegation of pastors from around the country. One of the highly anticipated sessions of the convention centers around the theme, "The Gospel in a World of Revolution."

Letter from Reginald Holmes to MLK

Reginald Holmes, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King for information about his church and his role as spiritual leader.

Letter from Rev. Hazel E. Foster to MLK

Reverend Hazel Foster writes to Dr. King in support of his continuous struggle. He talks about memorizing the Sermon on the Mount and the importance to him and leaders like Gandhi. He offers words of encouragement and prays that Dr. King may find peace during these hard times.

Letter from Rev. L. K. Jackson to MLK

Reverend L. K. Jackson thanks Dr. King for his hospitality while he was in Atlanta. Jackson states that his only regret was not seeing more of Dr. King and his wife.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from Ruth Wood to MLK

Ruth Wood of Virginia offers her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their efforts in search of a better society. Mrs. Wood also expresses her pleasure at attending Ebenezer Baptist Church and intends to attend the upcoming SCLC meeting.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

Letter from T. M. Benson to MLK

A representative from Peak Publications requests Dr. King's permission to use a portion of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract concerning racial issues and the church. The sender offers a hundred dollars for permission to reprint this section.

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

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