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Meredith March, 1966

Associated Archive Content : 20 results

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Casten, M.D.

Dr. King took the opportunity to address this letter to Daniel Casten, M.D. thanking him for his financial donation to the Mississippi "James Meredith" March. He noted that the march allowed Negroes, in Mississippi, to resolve their fears and fight for justice. A key quotation, in this document, stated to Dr. Casten, "You are a part of that dedicated group of people standing as a beacon light of hope to all of the disinherited men and women of our nation."

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

Letter from Robert Green to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

SCLC Education Director Robert Green writes Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach requesting a federal intervention on discrimination practices in Mississippi. Green complains that members of SCLC, SNCC, CORE and other organizations were denied access to restrooms during the 1966 James Meredith March Against Fear.

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.

Man's Struggle for Freedom

The "Chicago Tribune" reviews Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Mobilizer: February 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

Religion and Race Memo

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."

Telegram from Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne to James Meredith and MLK

Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne salute James Meredith and Dr. King for their service and dedication to the Civil Rights Movement.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.