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Montgomery Bus Boycott

Associated Archive Content : 147 results

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

MLK Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC

Dr. King, at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses numerous civil rights issues the organization is addressing throughout America.

MLK Addresses the District 65 AFL-CIO

This is an address given by Dr. King to District 65 of the National AFL-CIO Convention in Miami, Beach. Dr. King recognizes their contribution to the Southern Christen Leadership Conference.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

MLK Debuts the Book of the Year

This "Christian Century" ad debuts Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

MLK Postcard - American Negro Emancipation Centennial

The American Negro Emancipation Centennial issued this 1964 postcard containing Dr. King's brief biography. The postcard was designed to be used as a study guide in Negro history.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Speech: Acceptance of Spingarn Medal

Dr. King addresses the attendees at the NAACP 48th Annual Convention in Detroit, Michigan. He acknowledges the noble men and women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott Movement, for which his leadership earned him this award. Dr. King also discusses the ongoing struggle for civil rights and the nonviolent approach needed for the American Negro to win freedom and justice.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

Montgomery Bus Protest Planning Agenda

This outline documents information regarding the Montgomery Bus Protest.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Newspaper Article on MLK

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Missions Magazine published various articles concerning the baptist ministry and how the church is impacting its surrounding community. Dr. King contributed to the magazine by writing an article entitled "Out of the Long Night of Segregation." In the article, he writes about the nonviolent methods being used to end segregation in America.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

In this article, "Out of the Long Night of Segregation", Dr. King discusses the result of Negroes waiting to be treated as equals to no avail. He also presents several actions that should take place to provoke change.

Outline of MLK's 1962 Address to NAACP

In Dr. King's handwriting, this outline is from a speech he later addressed to the NAACP, at its 53rd Annual Convention in Atlanta, GA.

Partial Transcript: Speech at Guardian Association

Dr. King discusses the events in Montgomery, Alabama as a catalyst in what will become a new world. He stresses that the honor he receives from the Garden Association is not just for him, but for the fifty thousand supporters of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

People to People

Dr. King announces the SCLC's launching of a People to People tour of four northern cities. The SCLC launched this tour in the north to display a concern for the "moral welfare of Northern Negroes."

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