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Natural law

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

Capitalism

Dr. King illustrates a relationship between capitalism and anarchism.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Letter from Constance A. Price to Peter H. Dominick

Constance Price addresses grievances and complaints related to human rights. She demands appropriate and necessary congressional actions.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Man

Dr. King quotes Nobel Literature Prize winner William Faulkner on the prospects for man.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Science and Religion

Dr. King documents a quote regarding science and religion from "The Finding of God."

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

War and Pacifism

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

What Is Man?

This excerpt from Dr. King's book entitled "The Measure of Man" defines the physical and spiritual doctrines of Man. The passage highlights the sinful nature of human beings.