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Nonviolence

Associated Archive Content : 867 results

Letter from Bette Zugerman to Rev. Abernathy, SCLC

Ms. Zugerman writes Reverend Abernathy to introduce an enclosed document which she suggests is the "one and only non-violent answer to alleviate the suffering of all people."

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Letter from Bryce Nelson to MLK

Bryce Nelson, a SCLC contributor, writes Dr. King expressing that he shares the same views regarding the Vietnam War and commends Dr. King for asserting his beliefs.

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

Letter from Carmen Baptista to MLK

Carmen Baptista of Caracas, Venezuela writes Dr. King after reading his letter in the Saturday Review. She expresses her concern with the struggle for civil rights and since she is unable to make a monetary donation, she sends Dr. King a recording of a song she composed in honor of the freedom workers called "Coming Down the Road."

Letter from Carole A. Burnett to MLK

Mrs. Burnett informs Dr. King that her and her husband's financial support of the SCLC is suspended due to Dr. King's support of the Spring Mobilization and Vietnam Summer program. Though the Burnetts support the peace movement, they feel these two groups "present Hanoi's view of the Vietnam war."

Letter from Charles E. Blackburn to MLK

Charles Blackburn shares with Dr. King a mutual passion for change. Blackburn expresses that his concern is not with the "American Negroe's revolt against hypocrisy," but with the hypocrisy as it applies to the young white generation.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

Letter from Clara Sturgas Johnson to MLK

Clara Sturgas Johnson sends Dr. King a Christmas card with an enclosed article about the integration marches in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Clara Urquhart to MLK

Clara Urquhart invites Dr. King to speak at the Human Right Day Commemoration, sponsored by Amnesty International, on November 9, 1964.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Letter from David J. Dennis to MLK

In this letter, David Dennis requests a letter of reference from Dr. King, prior to his draft board meeting, so to challenge an induction into the armed forces.

Letter from David P. Gaines to MLK

David P. Gaines criticizes Dr. King's tactics for instant integration.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, Mr. Sakrikar offers a statue of Mahatma Gandhi for a children's park. He then explains the importance of this statue to the vision and practices of Dr. King as it relates to the methodology of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Don DuMont to MLK

Mr. DuMont expresses his disapproval of Dr. King's leadership of the negro race and the association of the movement with Christianity, because he seeks proof that Dr. King's movement is not "Communist-inspired." Dumont was an evangelist who ran unsuccessfully for a variety of political offices.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Josephine Davis

Dorothy Gaines thanks Josephine Davis and her friends for their generous donation to the SCLC. Gaines explains the current efforts of the SCLC as well as the monthly budget of the organization. She expresses the importance of financial contributions and encloses receipts from the donation.

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Letter from Dr. Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Dr. King expresses regret to Dr. Dick regarding his inability to participate in a series of meetings sponsored by the Conference of Mennonites in Winnipeg, Canada.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from E. M. to MLK

E.M. writes Dr. King to share his opinion concerning future demonstrations.

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK about Portugeese Translation of "Strength to Love"

Earl M. Smith writes to Dr. King requesting permission to translate and publish the book "Strength to Love" in Portuguese. Mr. Smith states that a Fellowship of Reconciliation representative can be responsible for translating.

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