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Nuclear Disarmament

Associated Archive Content : 34 results

1967 Geneva Convocation

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

A Proposal for Unity Day

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Ebenezer Church Bulletin and President Kennedy's Eulogy

This is an Ebenezer Baptist Church bulletin expressing appreciation for the congregation's various acts of kindness toward one another. On the opposite side of the bulletin, an outline can be found for a memorial speech for the late President Kennedy.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

This pamphlet provides information regarding the history, purpose and plans for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Benjamin Spock, Co-Chairman for the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy, solicits Dr. King as a sponsor for a testimonial dinner. The committee will honor Max Youngstein with its Eleanor Roosevelt Peace Award at the dinner.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Letter from Frances S. Smith to MLK

Frances Smith, Promotion Director for the Christian journal "Christianity and Crisis," asks Dr. King to write a few sentences regarding the "need for continuing analysis of the civil rights movement from the Christian perspective."

Letter from Katarina Ungdomsrad to MLK

Dr. King is invited to speak to the social democratic youth club "Katarina." The representatives of Katarina wish he would be able to speak "about peace in our time." The planned date of the event follows a day after Dr. King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from MLK to The People of Japan

Dr. King writes an encouraging letter to the people of Japan expressing his wishes to visit their country sometime soon.

Letter from Rabbi Gerald A. Goldman to MLK

Rabbi Gerald A. Goldman invites Dr. King to be a guest at the West Side Peace Committee Conference.

Letter from Sheldon L. Gutman to MLK

Sheldon L. Gutman writes Dr. King urging him to utilize his prominence by consistently speaking out about the issues of the world. Gutman also expresses concern regarding America's potential retaliation to China detonating a hydrogen bomb.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

MLK: New Year Hopes

In this draft of an article for the New York Amsterdam News for January 5, 1963, Dr. King refers to the near-disaster of the Cuban missile crisis and says it?s time for the nation to work on agreements on nuclear testing and disarmament and its United Nations goals. Domestic issues that demand attention are education, medical care for the aged and new civil rights legislation.

Oberlin College Commencement

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Reports of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam

The International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace issues a report of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam. Within the report, an appeal to the world is made on behalf of Vietnam and a resolution is offered to outline the ways in which a settlement can be reached between the United States and Vietnam.

SANE Action: Citizens' Milk Strike

As an economic act against pollution and a nuclear war, the National Committee For A SANE Nuclear Policy stages a Citizens' Milk Strike.

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