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Southern Christian Leadership Conference

After the success of the Montgomery, Alabama and Tallahassee, Florida bus boycotts, 60 leaders from ten states gathered in Atlanta in January 1957 to form the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration to coordinate challenges to segregation throughout the South. The name later changed to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Dr. King was selected to lead the new coalition. The SCLC, an association of chapters and local affiliates that adopted nonviolent action as the cornerstone of its strategy, became one of the most influential organizations of the Civil Rights Movement. King led the SCLC from Albany, through Birmingham, to the March on Washington and eventually to the Poor People’s Campaign carried out after his assassination in 1968.

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"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

"Focus Months" of the New York Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends

In this document, this New York Yearly Meeting Office unveiled a plan of action for the months of March and April of 1968. The causes they focused on were the Black Power Movement and Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign initiative.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

"Outrage in Alabama"

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

10th Anniversary SCLC Convention Program

This document contains a program for the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention hosted by Rev. Howard Creecy, President of the Atlanta Affiliate Chapter of the SCLC. The theme of the convention is "Where Do We Go From Here?"

10th Annual SCLC Convention Program

This document is a flyer for the 10th annual convention of the SCLC.

1963 Income Statement for the SCLC

This document is a financial balance sheet for the SCLC for the fiscal period 9/1/63 to 8/31/64. The statement gives a breakdown of revenues and expenses and lists a net deficit of $50,622.59.

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

5th Company Gives in to Breadbasket Demands for Jobs

The author writes about how operation breadbasket completed successful negotiations for new jobs for Negroes within the Chicago dairy industry.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

A Contentious Telephone Message

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

A Decade of SCLC

In this 10th Anniversary Journal for the SCLC, there are several topics covered to highlight the ten years of activity of the organization. Beginning with a story of the Civil Rights Movement's beginning, featuring Rosa Parks, to an article entitled "Where Do We Go From Here?"; this booklet summarizes many of the efforts made during the ten year existence of the SCLC.

A Knock At Midnight

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

A Letter to Advisory Council Member from Robert L. Green

In this correspondence, Robert L. Green writes an Advisory Council member concerning the Chicago adult education project. Mr. Green notifies the member that due to a reduced monetary grant from the federal government, the program will officially close.

A Memorandum Regarding the Cooperative Housing and Rehabilitation Program

In this memorandum from James P. Twomey, executive director of the Community Renewal Foundation Inc., writes to Mr. Donald Jordan of the Federal Housing Administration in regards to the building of cooperative housing and rehabilitation centers. The memorandum address certain issues such as the mortgage for the homes as well as the architects and attorneys

A Message from Jail

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

A Resolution Directed to the African Methodist Episopal Church

This resolution endorses the appointment of Donald Jacobs as Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

A Statement by Dr. King

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

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