Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Poor People's Campaign

Associated Archive Content : 91 results

Letter from Leon Hall to William Rutherford

Leon Hall writes William Rutherford requesting additional per diem fees for SCLC's Mississippi field staff.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from MLK to Frances H. Vicario

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. Vicario and the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company for their generous contribution to the SCLC. He explains how the contribution will help in a time of need as the SCLC enters the critical phase of their ten-year ministry.

Letter From MLK to Judge B.

Dr. King writes to Judge B, inviting him to the Board Meeting in Washington D.C. The meeting is to discuss the War in Vietnam and Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from MLK to SCLC Action Committee

Dr. King reminds members of the Action Committee of their upcoming meeting. He requests that each member come prepared to "make a report on [their] category of activity concerning the Washington Mobilization."

Letter from Mr. William A. Rutherford to Marlon Brando

In this letter, Mr. Rutherford writes on behalf of Dr. King to Mr. Brando. Dr. King is inquiring if Mr. Brando would be able to host a fundraising event in Hollywood on March 16, 1968.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter from R. D. Earnhardt to Ralph David Abernathy

R.D. Earnhardt requests a meeting with Rev. Abernathy to discuss Dr. King's death and the plan to proceed with the "Poor People's March on Washington, DC.

Letter from Robert D. Heslep to MLK

The Philosophy of Education Society, Southeastern Region writes Dr. King giving full moral support in the development of "The Poor People's Washington Campaign."

Letter from Stephen Johnston to MLK

Stephen Johnston, of the Communications Department at the National Cathedral in Washington D.C, forwards Dr. King a copy of the press release promoting his upcoming appearance. It was on this date that Dr. King delivered his second to last speech, "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter from Terrie to MLK

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

Letter from William L. Harris to MLK

William Harris, vice-chairman of the Extra Legal Forum at the Law School of the University of Virginia, invites Dr. King to speak at a Forum event.

Letter to Rev W. Harold Row from MLK about the Annual Brethren Service Dinner

In this letter to Reverend Row, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Brethren Service Dinner due to previous commitments with the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Letter to Reverend Ralph Abernathy from Eleanore Wallace

Mrs. Wallace writes to Rev. Abernathy in admiration of how he has carried on the work of Dr. King and wants to know how she can further contribute to the SCLC.

Letter to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

In this letter, the author suggests that the marchers of the Poor Peoples March should make a surprise visit to the estates of Senator Robert and Edward Kennedy during the historic event.

Letter to Senator Abraham Ribicoff from Earl Whitted Jr.

In this reply to Sen. Ribicoff, Earl Whitted endorses the idea of a guaranteed fixed annual income for the poor, under certain stipulations. It is proposed that a Federal Housing Project area would also provide various economic services to the underprivileged. This program would accomplish education and self-sustainability for those that have been politically and economically disadvantaged.

Mass Meeting on Washington Poor People's Campaign

This program outlines the structure of a mass meeting led by the SCLC at Vermont Avenue Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Among the speakers in attendance were Rev. Ralph David Abernathy and Dr. King.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

Memorandum from William A. Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette to SCLC Staff Members

William Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette inform the SCLC staff members of an impromptu retreat on the Poor People's Campaign, which will be held at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Memorandum Regarding Fund Raising and Sale of Memorial Objects

William A. Rutherford alerts SCLC members that Dr. King's name is being used in various parts of the country to obtain a profit. These individuals have used the organization's name as well as that of the Poor Peoples Campaign. These actions are unlawful and have not been certified by SCLC's headquarters.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

MLK Address at Mass Meeting in Eutaw, Alabama

Dr. King challenges the Negro residents of Eutaw, Alabama to participate in the upcoming SCLC Poor People's Campaign. In this address, he urges the citizens of Eutaw to occupy Washington, D.C. in an effort to press Congress for a redistribution of wealth in America. He urges, "All ye who are tired of segregation and discrimination, come unto us. All ye who are overworked and underpaid, come unto us."

Pages