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Poverty

Associated Archive Content : 455 results

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Letter from Macedonia Church to MLK

Members of Macedonia Church seek advice and help from Dr. King in regards to continuing Sunday worship service.

Letter From Mae P. Godfrey

Mae P. Godfrey requests monetary assistance to support her family during the upcoming Christmas holiday.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Marion Logan to MLK

Marion Logan writes to Dr. King to discuss his possible involvement with Project H. "Project H calls for Black America to demand of Congress ten billion dollars now to appropriate for the Federal Housing...that are administered by HUD."

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Mary L. Bryant to MLK

Mary L. Bryant writes Dr. King seeking help. She is a mother of eight and in desperate need of used clothes for her children. Her appeal comes as a result of financial hardship due to covering the medical expenses of a child with a serious illness.

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Maurice Dawkins, Assistant Director for Civil Rights of the Office of Economic Opportunity, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting aimed at funding summer projects for riot-prone cities. Mr. Dawkins has already encouraged President Johnson to help fund $75 million for summer programs.

Letter from MLK

Dr. King thanks the supporters of the "Martin Luther King Fund" for their integral role in the effort to end poverty and discrimination.

Letter From MLK Concerning the Sustainability of SCLC

Addressing the recipients of this letter as "Friends", Dr. King shares the triumphs and struggles of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference while on its continuous quest for civil rights. He concludes the message by encouraging readers to contribute support to this "urgent moral crusade".

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."

Letter from MLK to E. H. Lehman

Dr. King expresses concern regarding the illegal seating of elected representatives from Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Esther Thompson

Dr. King informs Mrs. Thompson that the SCLC does not have the resources to help aid her husband's sight. Dr. King recommends that she contact churches in her area for help.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

Letter from MLK to Mr. J.G. Anoma

Dr. King thanks Mr. Anoma for his monetary contribution to the SCLC. In addition, he praises Mr. Anoma for his poem entitled "Black Chicago". The poem addresses the current struggle faced by many "dark-skinned Americans" and reaffirms the aim of the SCLC-Chicago campaign.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Randall Elias

This letter is Dr. King's reply to Mr. Randall Elias's letter regarding a civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield. Dr. King writes that the SCLC is in Chicago, but is unaware of any planned civil rights march .

Letter from MLK to Mr. Randall Elias

This letter is Dr. King's reply to Mr. Randall Elias's letter regarding a civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield. Dr. King writes that the SCLC is in Chicago, but is unaware of any planned civil rights march .

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Letter From MLK to Reverend Sanders

In this letter, Dr. King expresses gratitude for the efforts Rev. Sanders has taken toward battling poverty.

Letter from MLK to Sargent Shriver

This letter to Sargent Shriver provides details about the SCLC's 1965 Annual Convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King also extends an invitation for Mr. Shriver to open the conference with an address about poverty, unemployment, and urban migration.

Letter from MLK to Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa

Dr. King thanks famous Teamsters President James Hoffa for their contribution of $25,000 to aid the SCLC. According to Dr. King, Hoffa and the Teamster's contribution will increase voter registration and economic development that will narrow the divide between whites and Negroes.

Letter from MLK to The People of Japan

Dr. King writes an encouraging letter to the people of Japan expressing his wishes to visit their country sometime soon.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Letter from Mr. William A. Rutherford to Marlon Brando

In this letter, Mr. Rutherford writes on behalf of Dr. King to Mr. Brando. Dr. King is inquiring if Mr. Brando would be able to host a fundraising event in Hollywood on March 16, 1968.

Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

Letter from Mrs. Daily to MLK

Mrs. Daily seeks to be compensated for the dollar bill she lost in the Lucky Buck Contest and requests Dr. King's assistance in this effort.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

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