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Presidential Elections

Associated Archive Content : 58 results

Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

Letter from Victor Sharrow to MLK

Victor Sharrow requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss implementing state and federal plans purportedly suggested by President Johnson. Mr. Sparrow believes that decreasing the number of racist southern representatives will have a collateral affect on southern apportionment of presidential electors.

Letter to MLK from Carolina Smith

The author negatively expresses ideas to Dr. King, in his actions towards the Vietnam War.

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Lincoln

Dr. King gives a brief description of the timeline for Abraham Lincoln. He describes Lincoln's many defeats and eventual presidential triumph.

List of Colleges Participating in Choice "68 Requesting King Information

This list includes the names of fifty colleges and universities participating in the "Choice 68" pre-election presidential campaigns. An additional twenty-five institutions also invited Dr. King to participate in their "Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., for President" campaigns.

Los Angeles Times: Prophetic Talk of Dr. King

Carl Greenberg, Political Editor for the Los Angeles Times, wrote this editorial about Dr. King's final trip to California and his opinion on the 1968 Presidential Campaign. Mr. Greenberg describes Dr. King's assessment of the war on poverty, the 1968 Democratic National Convention and possible support for Eugene McCarthy or Robert Kennedy.

Meeting on National Negro Politics

The Meeting on National Negro Politics highlights congressional races with "the most potential for political gains by black Americans" in the 1968 elections.

MLK Address to Southern Association of Political Scientists

Dr. King addresses the Southern Association of Political Scientists in November of 1964. This address consists of the accomplishments made because of the Civil Rights Movement and areas that society needs to improve upon.

MLK Drafted as a Presidential Candidate Announcement

The Peoples Committee of America drafts Dr. King as their candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Notes from S.B. Well to Ralph Abernathy

S. B. Well forwards Rev. Ralph Abernathy notes about several upcoming and current events pertaining to voter registration in the second and third district of Georgia.

Press Release on Voter Registration

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

Remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School

Harris Wofford, Jr. gives these remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School on March 8, 1960. Wofford has several ties with Dr. King in cases such as arranging a trip to India, helping to write "Stride Toward Freedom," and negotiating with Senator Kennedy and Vice-President Nixon during the 1960 presidential campaign. In addition, Wofford was the Special Assistant for Civil Rights under U. S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

Request for a Speaker Choice '68

Lonnie Longmire, representative of Baylor Universtiy, request that Dr. King suggest speakers that support his presidential candidacy for the Choice '68 project.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

SCLC Voter Registration Prospectus 1961

The SCLC Voter Registration Prospectus discusses the importance of the Negro vote. The SCLC believes that by voting, the Negro "can be heard and demand equal consideration." They believe that for a voter registration drive to be successful it must be church oriented. Thus, this prospectus outlines the programs and organizations needed for a church-oriented registration drive. Also included is a list of duties for the SCLC staff and a proposed budget for the drive.

Southern Christian Leadership Conference Resolution

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a resolution urging all religious institutions to encourage their members to vote in the local, state and national elections of 1964.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

Telegram from C. C. Shell to MLK

C. C. Shells writes Dr. King suggesting that segregationist Lester Maddox run for President of the United State with Dr. King as Vice President.

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

Thank-U-Gram from Rev. Phil Stovin to MLK and Harold E. Stassen

Rev. Phil Stovin extends his support to Harold E. Stassen and Dr. King for organizing Write-In votes in the 1968 Presidential Election.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

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