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Riots

Associated Archive Content : 205 results

"Danger in Demonstrations"

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

"Drop Dead"

This letter, sent to Dr. King, emphasizes a clear disgust with Dr. King's tactics. The author insists that the best thing he could do for his people is "drop dead."

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

5th Company Gives in to Breadbasket Demands for Jobs

The author writes about how operation breadbasket completed successful negotiations for new jobs for Negroes within the Chicago dairy industry.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

A Christmas Sermon

Dr. King discusses the topics of peace, the state of mankind, and his vision for the future during the delivery of this sermon to the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

ABC's Issues and Answers: MLK Interview

Dr. King sat down with Tom Jerriel, Atlanta Bureau Chief, and John Casserly, Washington Correspondent, of the American Broadcasting Company for their program "Issues and Answers." They discussed the civil rights movement, Dr. King's upcoming book, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that Dr. King would serve jail time in Birmingham.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

Annual Report by MLK

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK

An anonymous person wrote this letter to Dr. King, telling him that he is "directly responsible" for the murder of a 16 year old boy in Memphis, Tennessee.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous individual sends Dr. King newspaper clippings showing African-Americans participating in looting and violence. Dr. King is asked to review the articles and offer comments via television.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer blames Dr. King for riots and turmoil taking place in America.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

Answers in the American Way

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Black Marches and White Hysteria

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Black Out: Dress Rehearsal for the Revolution

Kenneth Goff warns about the potential race riots predicted in a Communist manual.

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Civilian Review Board in New York City

The author asserts that the New York community should initiate a new program by the Unity Council to include the appointment of an independent Civilian Review Board. This tactic is thought to bring peace and tranquility to the community.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

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