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Riots

Associated Archive Content : 205 results

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Helen E. Saum writes Dr. King concerning the issue of drop-outs and its affect on riots and demonstrations.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington to MLK

Huntington writes to Dr. King concerning the separation of a mother and child in hospitals after birth. Huntington states, "If we get back to nature's ways in our hospitals instead of starting each new human life in America by rejecting it, as it were, I suspect the increase of juvenile delinquency would melt away."

Letter From Henry Springs Jr. to MLK

Mr. Henry Springs requests Dr.King's help in creating "Action Programs," that would be beneficial to the African-American community in Lake County, Illinois.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Irv Kupcinet, a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, encloses a copy of his special column including Dr. King's power quote on NBC's Meet the Press. The interview was in direct correlation to the riots that occured in many urban cities.

Letter from Iva Sturm to MLK

The author requests Dr. King to answer questions to solidify the political practices in America before he is to vote democratically.The questions involve concerns surround military, political, and economic issues within the United States. The authors' primary contention is the Vietnam War.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter from J. Reynolds to MLK

J. Reynolds expresses his opinion on Dr. King's recent activism in Memphis and describes it as a "riot." Mr. Reynolds questions Dr. King's intentions and highlights the negative outcome of the demonstration.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK

Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Lloyd E. Abbey to Mr. Duncan J. Parks about Communism

In this letter Lloyd E. Abbey reacts to an article in the Star-Gazette. Abbey asserts that "Our survival, in relation to the ideology of communism, is very questionable" and "The principle fault... ... the nine old men...," namely Dr. King, Benjamin Spock, William Coffin, Rap Brown, 'Hooligan' [Stokely] Carmichael and others. Abbey connects this to the war in Vietnam.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Letter from Mark Henderson to MLK

In this letter Mark Henderson comments on the incidents at the South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina known as the Orangeburg Massacre.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Maurice Dawkins, Assistant Director for Civil Rights of the Office of Economic Opportunity, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting aimed at funding summer projects for riot-prone cities. Mr. Dawkins has already encouraged President Johnson to help fund $75 million for summer programs.

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Letter from Ms. Katherine Livermore to MLK

Ms. Livermore criticizes Dr. King for his alleged association with the Communist Party. She also makes several historical and contextual references to slavery and the current plight of the Negro race. She concludes with a warning, "be careful this summer."

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

Letter from Pamela Schnida to MLK

Pamela Schnida writes to Dr. King requesting information on the riots that occurred in 1967.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

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