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Riots

Associated Archive Content : 205 results

Redbook: The Police

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

Revolution In The Classroom

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

Robert Greene's Resolutions

Robert Greene, of Puerto Rican and African American ancestry, resolves to censure the State of New York. He lists a plethora of racist activities and "Orwellian deceptions" as causes.

SCLC News Bulletin

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

SCLC Newsletter: October-November 1965

This SCLC newsletter depicts the courage of SCLC workers putting their lives on the line while fighting for civil rights. The newsletter also highlights pictures from SCLC's ninth annual convention in Birmingham Alabama and a children's book about Dr. King.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Presented here, is a draft of an article published in the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC Newsletter. The article highlights the discontentment of the author in relation to acts of violence against Jewish citizens.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

SCLC Press Release: Civil Rights Leader Protests Antipoverty Cutbacks

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a press release containing a telegram that Reverend Ralph David Abernathy sent to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Abernathy expresses his concern with President Johnson's proposed cuts to the Office of Economic Opportunity's funding.

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

SCLC: Summary Of Ninth Annual Convention

This summary of the SCLC's Ninth Annual Convention describes events that were instrumental in the formation of the organization. The document outlines the ongoing projects of the organization and offers proposals for future efforts.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Speech to National Press Club

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

Summary of 1968 Harris Survey Results

This document summarizes the most recent Harris Surveys from 1968, reporting how the American people feel about President Johnson. Topics focused on include the War on Poverty, Vietnam, and Congress.

Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

Survey from Jack Hillhouse to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Mass Communications Media

This incomplete survey form is from a graduate student, Jack Hillhouse, seeking to understand the connection, if any, between mass communications media and race riots, demonstrations, and disturbances.

Telegram from Alexander Edelmann to MLK

Alexander Edelmann, a professor from the University of Nebraska, criticizes Dr. King for not taking a stance against black rioters in Atlanta. Edelmann mentions the he once was a supporter of Dr. King, but now considers him "irresponsible."

Telegram from Charles Morris to MLK

Mr. Morris, president of The Negro Business and Industrial Association, extends an invitation to Dr. King to participate in an initiative designed to combat the rioting in Negro communities.

Telegram from Howard Farkas to MLK

Mr. Farkas writes Dr. King asking him to address the recent acts of violence targeting African Americans.

Telegram from Joseph Anderson to MLK

Joseph Anderson urges Dr. King to "call forth a day of prayer" to ease the uproar, most notably overshadowing such U.S. cities as Detroit and Newark during the long, hot summer of 1967.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

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