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Sit-ins

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MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

MLK Address to a North Carolina Branch of the NAACP

Dr. King addresses a public meeting of Charlotte, North Carolina's NAACP branch. He lists five actions the Negro can do to assist America with realizing the dream. The Negro must challenge the system of segregation, make efforts to gain ballots, and sacrifice to achieve freedom.

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

MLK Address to Southern Association of Political Scientists

Dr. King addresses the Southern Association of Political Scientists in November of 1964. This address consists of the accomplishments made because of the Civil Rights Movement and areas that society needs to improve upon.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

MLK Addresses the District 65 AFL-CIO

This is an address given by Dr. King to District 65 of the National AFL-CIO Convention in Miami, Beach. Dr. King recognizes their contribution to the Southern Christen Leadership Conference.

MLK and New York Protest Meeting Speakers

The SCLC releases a statement to the media regarding Dr. King and other Southern leaders trip to New York to address a series of mass protest meetings. This document outlines a schedule of meetings and also announces that Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. and Actor Harry Belafonte will join the protest.

MLK Confidential Memorandum

Dr. King outlines the SCLC's direct action program for the communities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery.

MLK Draft on Jackie Robinson and Hall of Fame

Dr. King highlights the achievements of Jackie Robinson in this article about Robinson's induction into baseball's Hall of Fame. Dr. King applauds Robinson for using his celebrity status for the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Draft Text Retrieved by T.D. Johnston

The document is a dedication from T. D. Johnston of Huntsville, Alabama to the King Center. Mr. Johnston acknowledges being on an Eastern Airline plane with Dr. King in 1961, where he noticed that Dr. King tossed a speech text that he found. He decided to hold on to the document for preservation and donated it to the King Center. Martin Luther King, III received the document on behalf of the King Center.

MLK in Memoriam

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

MLK Speech at NAACP Sponsored Rally for Civil Rights

Dr. King gives a speech in which he addresses a myriad of issues on the subject of civil rights.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

MLK Statement on Voter Registration

Dr. King urges the African American community to register and vote. He outlines the importance of voting by making historcial references relevant to the community.

MLK's Mandate for White Christians Review

Dr. King provides a review for Kyle Hazelden's book, "Mandate for White Christians." In his review he gives an overview of the book's content, along with his opinion on its value.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Press Release Issued by MLK

The following document is a press release issued by Dr. King. In the first section, he comments on the success of various civil rights demonstrations across the nation. In the second section, of the press release, Dr. King makes a clear distinction between race riots and nonviolent movements in Alabama.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Proposals

Dr. King writes a proposal to the Democratic and Republican national conventions regarding the Constitutional rights and human dignity of Negroes. King warns the parties that "platforms and promises are no longer sufficient to meet the just and insistent demands of the Negro people for immediate free and unconditional citizenship." King earnestly requests the parties to ensure: Negro people in the South secure the right to vote, an end to terror against Negroes, and enforcement of the 1954 Supreme Court decision against school segregation.

Prospective Negotiation Procedure with Merchants

This draft document outlines a plan to eradicate racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. It includes a detailed list of prospective negotiation procedures with merchants and a timeline for events in Birmingham, Alabama.

Racism in the United States

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

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