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Social Activism

Associated Archive Content : 154 results

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Letter from a Weary Taxpayer to MLK

A weary taxpayer writes Dr. King informing him that a 15 million dollar bond issue was passed to pave roads in Cobb County; however, blacks cannot buy property in the area. The writer is angered because Negroes still have to help pay off the bond through taxes and asserts that the case must be taken to federal court.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Beresford Hayward, Planning Consultant of the Department of Education in Puerto Rico, writes Dr. King to inform him of the racial climate in Puerto Rico and its issue of Cuban immigration. Mr. Hayward also presents a comparison between the race issues inflicting Puerto Rico and the United States of America.

Letter from Celeste Buches to MLK

Celeste Buches writes to Dr. King requesting campaign information for the Choice 68' mock presidential elections at Mt. St. Scholastica and St. Benedict's College in Kansas.

Letter from David B. Lord to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King , David B. Lord draws connections between the Vietnam War and poverty in American society. He agrees with Dr. King's stance on the war and approach to civil rights. According to Mr. Lord, real civil rights progress cannot be made until a solution is found to the war.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Letter from E. Cowles Andrus to MLK

Mrs. Cowles Andrus commends Dr. King a speech made in Washington. Having donated in the past, Mrs. Cowley Andrus was so impressed and inspired by the speech that she increased her contribution with hope it would be of great benefit.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter from Ervin R. Meyer to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Ervin R. Meyer informs Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy that he is against the Poor People's March on Washington. Mr. Meyers perceives these demonstrations as attracting "law breakers" that do not reflect Christian actions. The author identifies additional organizations and expresses their opposition to the SCLC's Christian mission.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK with Concerns of Supporting SCLC

Sandperl pleas with Dr. King to review and respond to his four point proposal, proclaiming that only then will he and Joan Baez continue to support SCLC. Sandperl criticizes SCLC for not being honest with it's coworkers, being unorganized, and self defeating. Sandperl wants Dr. King to convince him otherwise, but does not view the SCLC as being able to achieve social change from what he experienced at the retreat in South Carolina. Sandperl promises support if his proposal is adopted by the SCLC.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

The EIP, an association which seeks to establish the greatest number of schools in the world, asks Dr. King to become a member of their Board of Patrons.

Letter from James E. Byrd to MLK

James E. Byrd, Campus Coordinator at Lenoir Rhyne College, writes Dr. King requesting materials for the Choice '68 campaign.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from John G. Allerdice Jr. to MLK

John Allerdice writes Dr. King on behalf of the Human Relations Council of Shortridge High School regarding a planned conference that will discuss human relations for the high school students of Indianapolis. They would like for Dr. King to "tape a short message" for them to use.

Letter from John Harrigan Jr. to MLK

John Harrigan, Jr. describes his education and work experience to Dr. King, and explains his desire to transition to the social revolutionary movement. He offers his services to Dr. King, stating his reimbursement requirements. He ends his letter by outlining a four step process to solve poverty in the United States.

Letter from M. Strawder to MLK

M. Strawder welcomes Dr. King to the Chicago community while informing him of the current social struggles that they are faced with.

Letter from Marguerite B. Pilling to Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy

Marguerite B. Pilling writes Dr. Abernathy to show her support of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes the Negro could actually bring the United States back to a time of decency by bringing back prayer in public schools and removing violence from TV.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

In this letter, Mr. Dawkins informs Dr. King that the Summer Community Organization and Political Education, S.C.O.P.E., stands to benefit from the involvement of the VISTA organization.

Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

Letter from MLK to FDR III

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the contribution of $1,000.00 made by Franklin D. Roosevelt III to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

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