Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Social Activism

Associated Archive Content : 154 results

Special to the New York Times: A Cry of Hate or a Cry for Help

Dr. King addresses the recent riots occurring in the county of Watts near Los Angeles. He believes the riots are not solely race-driven but are also motivated by unemployment. The riots are utilized as a way to be heard, and not as a way to destroy.

Speech to National Press Club

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

St. Augustine Tutorial Project

This document references a tutorial program organized by students from Yale for the benefit of students in St. Augustine. The flyer advises those interested in the program to stop by the SCLC office and fill out an information sheet.

Stars for Freedom 1967

This magazine highlights celebrities who have contributed to the Civil Rights Movement as well as the contributions of SCLC and other programs across America. Featured in the article is statement by SCLC President, Dr. King.

State of New York Civil Rights Bureau - 1967 Annual Report

This is the overview of the advancements and achievements affiliated with the New York Civil Rights Bureau, in 1967.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Summer Session Banquet: The Role of Education in the Civil Rights Movement

Dr. King gives an address on the role of education in the civil rights movement at Syracuse University's Fourteenth Annual Summer Session Banquet.

Telegram from George Meares to MLK

On behalf of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, George Meares expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts and achievements.

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Telegram from Howard Farkas to MLK

Mr. Farkas writes Dr. King asking him to address the recent acts of violence targeting African Americans.

Telegram from MLK to Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King expresses his gratification to Senator Edward M. Kennedy for sponsoring the amendment to abolish the poll tax in state elections.

Telegram from MLK to H. Rap Brown

In this telegram, Dr. King tells H. Rap Brown that he will undertake all measures to stop Brown being denied free movement and basic constitutional rights.

Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.

Telegram from Robert M. Ball to MLK

Mr.Ball, Social Security Administration Commissioner, invites Dr. King to participate in an information session concerning a proposed medicare program. The meeting will be held in Baltimore, MD.

Telegram from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman Guyot to MLK

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman expresses concern regarding the SCLC's exclusion of "indigenous people of various political orientation in preparing the program" for the annual convention held in Jackson, MS.

Telegram from Unius Griffin to MLK

Unius Griffin writes to Dr. King regarding four Negro political candidates seeking elective offices in Wilcox County, Alabama. Griffin includes information on the increasing numbers of registered Negro voters and speaks to the various intents of each Negro candidate.

Temporary Injunction Filed Against Wyatt Tee Walker

This is a legal document for a temporary injunction filed by the city of Birmingham against Wyatt Tee Walker.

The American Dream

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

The Crisis - NAACP 50 Years - Freedom Civil Rights Progress

This 1959 issue of The Crisis celebrates the 50th anniversary of the NAACP. The contents include events that vary from legislation cases to African-American accomplishments relevant to the time.

The Deep South in Social Revolution

The Deep South in Social Revolution was the theme for the 1961 SCLC Annual Meeting.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

The Road to Freedom

This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Transformed Nonconformist

In this draft of the "Transformed Nonconformist", Dr. King urges the abandonment of societal practices of injustice.

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.

Two Americas

This essay highlights the realities of poverty stricken aliens in an affluent society. Through its examination of Negro-white relations, urban riots, and the War on Poverty, the author insists that the nonviolent struggle for civil rights must continue.

Pages