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Strategic Planning

Associated Archive Content : 54 results

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

Agenda of the General Committee of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations

This document is an agenda and lists meeting minutes regarding the approval of actions, nominations, budget, and miscellaneous items for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from Annie L. Cook to MLK

Annie Cook asks Dr. King to make a speech at a program sponsored by the Greenbrier County branch of the NAACP. She predicts that the program will be informative and improve communication between Negros and whites.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

Letter from J. D. Williams to MLK

Professor Williams requests a phone interview with Dr. King concerning the studies of a select group of Honors students at the University of Utah.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from John Roney to Dr. King

Mr. Roney explains to Dr. King that the government will create oppressed social hierarchy within society. As a result, he requests that Dr. King responds to his plea or he will be believe that the rumors of government oppression are true.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Letter from MLK to A. Phillip Randolph

Dr. King writes A. Philip Randolph to acknowledge the need for future strategic planning in the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from Richard W. Boone to MLK

A letter from Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens Crusade Against Poverty, to Dr. King, enclosing the preliminary draft of the C.C.A.P.'s training proposal to the Ford Foundation.

Letter from the Interpreters' House to MLK

Carlyle Marney and J. C. Herrin invite Dr. King to attend a conference to discuss the future mission and tasks for American Baptists in the South.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

Letter from William H. Chester to Rev. A. D. King

William Chester, Regional Director of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, writes Rev. A. D. King as a follow-up to their earlier telephone conversation regarding the transports unions supporting the Negro community in Alabama. Chester provides suggestions for how the SCLC should try to secure the participation of the large unions, such as the Teamsters and the National Maritime Union. Chester also addresses a copy of the letter to Dr. King, Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Shuttlesworth.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to Hubert Jones

Mr. Walker, SCLC Executive Assistant, responds on behalf of Dr. King to Hubert Jones regarding a "nation-wide project." Walker feels that the project would be premature at the moment and explains that his efforts locally would be valuable.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

MLK's Reply to an Invitation

Dr. King regrets to inform Robin Skuce of his inability to accept her invitation to speak at a seminar for a Canadian high school under the auspice of the United Nations Association in Canada. Dr. King informs Miss Skuce that he must decline her offer due to preparation of several SCLC programs scheduled for the following year.

Montgomery Bus Protest Planning Agenda

This outline documents information regarding the Montgomery Bus Protest.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

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