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Theology

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"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

"God's Judgment on Western Civilization"

The document contains notes for a sermon given by Dr. King entitled, "God's Judgement on Western Civilization."

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

A Religion of Doing

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Abelard on Universals and theMethod of Descartes

Dr. King references Peter Abelard, medieval French philosopher and theologian. He discerns that universals cannot be things or words. Rather, the universal is a concept. King maintains that this quandary is relevant to "Schoolmen" and particularly the dogma of the Church. He continues by also noting philosopher Rene Descartes, and that "he was at fault in overemphasizing mathematical method."

Abstract of MLK's Dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman"

Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s abstract of his doctoral dissertation in Systematic Theology at Boston University details the fundamental problem of evaluating the concept of God in the philosophical and theological thoughts of Paul Tillich and Nelson Wieman; methods of procedure implemented throughout his research; and his conclusions drawn from the teachings of Tillich and Wieman.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

Anabaptists

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Angels

Dr. King mentions the concept of patron angels that appears in Daniel 10:13, 20, and 21.

Angeology

Dr. King cites the reference in Isaiah 6:2 to a seraphim, likely "a winged human figure."

Anglicanism

This note card briefly compares Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

Annihilationism

Dr. King defines annihilationism as a belief regarding the death of the wicked.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

Appeal to Billy Graham Regarding Religion

Matakichi Saito questions Billy Graham about his views on religion as it relates to discrimination.

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Arnobius

Dr. King gives information on fourth century teacher, Arnobius and his conversion to Christianity.

Athanasius, St.

Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian St. Athanasius, identifying him as the defender of the Nicene faith.

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