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Totalitarianism

Associated Archive Content : 24 results

"Outrage in Alabama"

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

A Tribute to the Organized Labor Movement

The Jewish Labor Committee extends heartfelt gratitude to the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) for twenty-five years of fraternal cooperation.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

MLK on Communist Infiltration

Dr. King responds to an article written by Joseph Alsop and J. Edgar Hoover that charged communism had infiltrated the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

My Dream: Julian Bond and the Constitution by MLK

Dr. King elaborates on the "hypocritical" and "high-handed injustice" executed by the United States and their refusal to seat Julian Bond for the Georgia State Legislature. Abraham Lincoln is highlighted for his exercise of the democratic right in his stance against Congress involving the United States war with Mexico. Dr. King asserts the irony in the method of Mr. Bond's colleagues and critics whom either indirectly or directly supported racial segregation. Dr.

Remember Who You Are!

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Robert Greene's Resolutions

Robert Greene, of Puerto Rican and African American ancestry, resolves to censure the State of New York. He lists a plethora of racist activities and "Orwellian deceptions" as causes.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

The American Dream

This document contains the text of an address that Dr. King gave at Plymouth Church of The Pilgrims in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King describes the steps that should be taken in order to make the American Dream a reality.

The Christian Church and Communist Atheism

Helmut Gollwitzer, a Protestant theologian, completes this body of work entitled "The Christian Church and Communist Atheism." The author states that, "socialists may be Christians, but Christians must be socialists."

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

Totalitarianism

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

What Is Man?

This excerpt from Dr. King's book entitled "The Measure of Man" defines the physical and spiritual doctrines of Man. The passage highlights the sinful nature of human beings.

Who Are We?

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.