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African American History

Associated Archive Content : 126 results

"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

Annual Report by MLK

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Chicago Freedom Fund Festival

The Chicago Freedom Fund Festival, organized by Mahalia Jackson, served as a benefit for the SCLC.

Citizenship Education Proposal

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Congratulatory Telegram to Thurgood Marshall from MLK

Dr. King congratulates Thurgood Marshall on being appointed to the US Supreme Court. Dr. King also emphasizes that Marshall's position is a major advancement towards a color-blind society.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

Excerpts from Remarks of The Vice President

Vice President Richard M. Nixon speaks about the Eisenhower Administration’s support of Negroes in the fight to remove discrimination in employment.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

House Resolution 12962

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

If I were a Negro

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

Letter from Alfred Norwood to MLK

Alfred Norwood writes to Dr. King highlighting his experiences as a student at Lincoln school, Berkeley, California.

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