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United Nations

Associated Archive Content : 154 results

Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

Remarks by MLK in Acceptance of the Spingarn Medal

In his acceptance speech for the Spingarn Medal, Dr. King remarks about the need for continuing the fight for social justice and equality around the world. He acknowledges the work of NAACP along with protesters as they continue to be on the frontline in addressing the nation's social ills.

Reports of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam

The International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace issues a report of the Stockholm World Conference on Vietnam. Within the report, an appeal to the world is made on behalf of Vietnam and a resolution is offered to outline the ways in which a settlement can be reached between the United States and Vietnam.

S.C.L.C's Rev. Bevel Charges U.S. Gov't With Genocide

This article, details the work and beliefs of Reverend James L. Bevel, a Baptist minister and field representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Bevel claims that the United States Government is committing genocide against Negro people.

Schedule of Buses for Pacem in Terris Participants and their Guests

This schedule of bus routes is intended for Pacem in Terris participants and their guests. Trips include travel to Convocation sessions and a concert held at Victoria Hall.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

South African Victims of Apartheid

The American Committee on Africa hosts a human rights rally and benefit on behalf of the victims of South African Apartheid. This program provides a brief history and overall purpose of the committee and outlines the projected schedule of events.

Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists

This document is informing prospective contributors about the Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists. Dr. King was listed to contribute to the publication with "Freedom and Equality."

Statement by MLK

Dr. King releases a public statement addressing the issues regarding the conflict in Vietnam.

Statement on Warnings Issued by U Thant

On behalf of Secretary General of the United Nations U Thant, this letter serves as a call to action for every government, organization, and organ of world opinion to take a firm stance against American military escalation in the Vietnam conflict.

States Avoid Woes: Hughes and Stanley Attacks Deadbeats in UN

These are two articles from the Des Moines Sunday Register. The first article entitled "States Avoid Woes: Hughes" by Donald Kaul focuses on a statement by then Iowa Governor Harold Hughes. Hughes asserts that it is the right and responsibility of the states to solve domestic social problems. The other article explores the opinion of then state representative David Stanley. Stanley believes that all United Nations members should share in the operating costs of the UN.

Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie Writes to MLK

Johan Keijser, writing for the Board of the Foundation of Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie, sends a letter to Dr. King. It includes a list of names of those whom the group has invited to form a committee of support for their efforts in creating a "provisional world government." The list includes artists, intellectuals, national government leaders, and religious leaders from all over the world. Remarkably, it also includes "father of the hydrogen bomb" Edward Teller.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Telegram from MLK to Rabbi Abraham Heschel

Dr. King writes Rabbi Heschel indicating that he will happily serve as a sponsor of the nationwide campaign to end bombings in Vietnam.

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

The Cold War: The Insanity of Deterrence

This brochure depicts a child asking "mommy, what's an H bomb?" and serves as anti-nuclear war propaganda.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

The Danger of A Little Progress

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

The Student Voice

SNCC's Newsletter, The Student Voice, updates readers on the progress of the civil rights movement throughout the United States. This issue gives details on incidents of discrimination throughout the South, boycotts, "Stand-Ins," and education opportunities for African Americans.

The Student Voice: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Newsletter

In this issue of The Student Voice, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee writes about the progress being made in the Civil Rights Movement, including recent ... desegregation of all public golf courses in Mobile, Alabama and the desegregation of lunch counters in Atlanta, Georgia.

The United Nations Special Committee of 24

The United Nations Special Committee of 24 plans a series of meetings to discuss colonial territories in Africa, Aden, Oman, Mauritius, Seychelles and others.

The United States and Eastern Asia: The Report of a Conference of Asian Scholars

Harry D. Gideonse, President of Freedom House, sends Dr. King two reports concerning international relations between the United States and Asia. The first of the two is a report on the international policies that have been implemented between Western nations and the countries of Asia. The second is a report that tracks the progress of freedom throughout those regions.

Transcript: Press Conference USA

Robert Lodge questions Dr. King about the future and past of the Civil Rights Movement during a Press Conference USA recording.

Transformed Nonconformist

In this draft of the "Transformed Nonconformist", Dr. King urges the abandonment of societal practices of injustice.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

United Nations Seminar Brochure

This pamphlet offers information on the registration, time, place, and cost of the United Nations Seminar being held in Washington D.C from October 17-21, 1966. Enclosed is a registration form for the Seminar.

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