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United States. Dept. of Justice

Associated Archive Content : 115 results

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."

Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines

The Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines sponsored, Future Impact, a program to promote economic development for the company. The program also aids in enhancing the skills of the company's black employees.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

How Dodd Differs From Powell/Dwellings Toured

The newspaper article entitled, "How Dodd Differs From Powell," examines how differently Senator J. Dodd and Congressman Adam C. Powell were treated after a major controversy. This controversy resulted in the removal of Congressman Powell from office.

In a Word- Now

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

Integration Details in Wilcox County

On September 23, 1966, Wilcox County School in Alabama was integrated. However, the amount of "physical acts" and "extreme brutality" directed towards the Negro students was so great that the parents of the students prohibited their children from attending just a few months later. In this report, Robert L. Green, the Education Consultant to the SCLC, outlines the details of this event to Mr. John Doar of the U.S. Justice Department. He tells Mr.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Letter from Assistant Deputy Attorney General William A. Geoghegan to MLK

William Geoghegan, Assistant Deputy Attorney General, thanks Dr. King for his telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the Fifth Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals.

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the US Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a joint telegram concerning an investigation in Lee County, Georgia.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a recent telegram concerning an investigation in the alleged assault upon Miss Shirley Gaines by an Albany police officer.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, informs Dr. King that his department is inquiring into events in Greenwood, Mississippi that Dr. King brought to his attention. He assures Dr. King that the Justice Department will take appropriate action with respect to any violations of federal law.

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