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United States. Dept. of Justice

Associated Archive Content : 115 results

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Letter from William A. Geoghegan to MLK

William A. Geoghegan, US Department of Justice Assistant Deputy Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Memorandum from MLK to SCLC

In this memorandum to the representatives of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. King encloses two resolutions that the Executive Board approved. The resolutions state that a letter should be sent to Senator Thomas C. Hennings and Attorney General William P. Rogers. Dr. King suggests that the resolutions be adopted at all of the SCLC's mass meetings, scheduled for February 12th.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

News from the SCEF

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Notes on Atlanta Housing Hearing

This document contains the United States Commission on Civil Rights notes on an Atlanta Housing hearing. The Commission believes that Atlanta will present "new aspects of the problem." The Commission is also collecting information to determine whether equal opportunity in housing is denied due to discrimination. Also included are questions the Commission plans to ask regarding housing.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

People In Action Column: "Can We Ever Repay Them"

This column by Dr. King in the New York Amsterdam News highlights Dr. C.O. Simpkins, leader of the United Christian Movement. Following cross burnings on his front lawn, death threats, and other harassment, both his home and summer house were bombed. The arsonists returned again the next day to ensure the complete destruction of both buildings.

People In Action: "Virginia's Black Belt"

In this article from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King describes his expereince on his "People to People" tour through the United States, noting his experience in the "black belt" in Virginia.

Press Release: MLK Demands US Action Against Killers of Negroes in Orangeburg, S.C.

Dr. King's telegram to United States Attorney General Ramsey Carlk was reprinted in this press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In it, Dr. King urges the Justice department to take proper legal action against the perpetrators of violence against Negroes following the wounding and killing of 37 to 50 students in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Questions and Answers on the Civil Rights Act of 1967

This document contains questions and answers on the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1967 regarding federal and state jury trials, equal employment, fair housing, protection against interference with constitutional rights, and extending the life of the civil rights commission.

Rep. Powell Unseating to Stick?

This article discusses public opinion surrounding former U.S. House Representative Adam Clayton Powell's ethics investigation, and subsequent ousting from office.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

SCLC Direction

The SCLC establishes a new direction in which they are seeking to promote nonviolence on an international level by creating a universal human rights movement. Ira Sandperl details this new direction of the SCLC which includes the improvement of current political and economic issues.

SCLC Direction

Ira Sandperl writes on what he believes should be the direction of SCLC. It is stressed that SCLC should engage in a universal nonviolent human rights movement.

SCLC News Release

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release stating Dr. King's demands that the Department of Justice act immediately to halt brutal treatment and intimidation of Negro school children and parents in the State of Mississippi. Dr. King cites several violent and near violent incidents that have occurred in Mississippi during the month of October.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

SCLC Newsletter: July 1963

This SCLC newsletter features numerous articles written by members of the SCLC regarding Birmingham, Alabama. Also featured is a graphic story of the crisis in Birmingham.

SCLC Press Release About Telegram to Robert Kennedy

The SCLC issues a press release, which discloses the text of telegram from Dr. King to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

Selma Friendship Day Report

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

SNCC Newsletter - The Student Voice

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began publishing "The Student Voice" in June 1960. The news magazine contained reports on SNCC activities, marches, sit-ins and other events related to the civil rights movement. The copy shown here is addressed to Andy Young.

Speech to National Press Club

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

Statement by MLK on Jailings

Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

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