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Equality

Associated Archive Content : 659 results

"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

A Knock At Midnight

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

A Look To The Future

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

A Minority of One

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

A Tribute to the Organized Labor Movement

The Jewish Labor Committee extends heartfelt gratitude to the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) for twenty-five years of fraternal cooperation.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Minutes

These meeting minutes of the Executive Board of the A. Philip Randolph Institute include discussions on the urgent need for legislative action on the Freedom Budget, a possible theoretical and analytical magazine on the Negro struggle for equality, and celebration of Mr. Randolph's 80th birthday.

Accepting the New York City Medallion Draft

Dr. King accepts the New York City Medallion on behalf of all persons, both black and white, involved in the fight for social justice and equality.

Acrostic Poem About MLK

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

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