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Equality

Associated Archive Content : 659 results

Birmingham Manifesto

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama by the African American community and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights.

Bold Design for a New South

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Catholics Involved in Integration

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

Challenge on Luther King

The author of this article says that Rev. I. L. de Villiers' letter lacked moderation, reasoned argument and tolerance of a different point of view. He also says that anyone who advocates for racial equality is branded as communist and that Afrikaners are suffering as a result.

Chicago Freedom Rally

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood, Inc. Program

The Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood organized this program where Dr. King makes a special address.

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

City Wide Freedom Rally Featuring MLK

This 1964 program from a rally in Canton, Ohio, features Dr. King as speaker.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Covenant Between Operation Breadbasket and The A&P Company

The Chicago Unit of The A&P Company seeks to build a relationship with the Negro community by implementing equal opportunity employment policies. In return, the ministers of Operation Breadbasket will bring to attention the extensive commitment the A&P Company has to the economic and social future of the Negro community.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Criticism of MLK's Methods

The Author of this letter is very critical of Dr. King and accuses him of hating the white race and requests he return the Nobel Peace Prize.

Crusade For Citizenship

"Crusade For Citizenship," an initiative of the SCLC, illustrates the importance of Negro voters in the South. The brochure incorporates important facts to implement emphasis on how imperative the cause is.

Crusade For The Ballot

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a pamphlet addressing the need for increased registration of Negro voters in the southern states of America.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Daniel B. Brewster Address before the Senate

The Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, U. S. Senator from Maryland, addresses the President of the United States and the Second Session of the 88th Congress regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Desegregation and the Future

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Diary in Jail

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

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