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Equality

Associated Archive Content : 659 results

Letter from Bryce Nelson to MLK

Bryce Nelson, a SCLC contributor, writes Dr. King expressing that he shares the same views regarding the Vietnam War and commends Dr. King for asserting his beliefs.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from C. Alexander Brown to MLK

C. Alexander Brown requests that Dr. King and the SCLC conduct an investigation on the conditions of black prisoners in American jails. After reading about cruel conditions in an Arkansas prison, Brown questions how many innocent black prisoners are confined.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

Letter from C. Ray Ballard to MLK Regarding Adam Clayton Powell

In this letter, Mr. Ballard expresses disappointment to hear a recent radio report of Dr. King's political support for Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Ballard defines this as a missed opportunity to promote racial justice.

Letter from Carolyn Martinelli to Ralph Abernathy After the Death of MLK

Mrs. Martinelli writes Rev. Abernathy in the month following Dr. King's death, encouraging him to continue promoting a philosophy of love and equality. Martinelli identifies herself as a white housewife, teacher and mother of two, who has only known three Negroes in her whole life. . Although she has never known poverty, her desire is for all Americans to know the truth and work to resolve these problems in society.

Letter from Charles C. Diggs Jr. to the General Motors Corporation

In this letter, Congressman Charles Diggs of Michigan asks Mr. Louis Seaton of General Motors for his comments in regards to automobile dealerships. The Congressman then points out that General Motors is the only one of the "Big 3" automobile companies that has not taken initiative in having a Negro franchise holder.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Letter from Charles Henry to Ralph David Abernathy

Mr. Henry chastises Rev. Abernathy for an adverse comment he made towards White people. As a negro, he urges that the only way to get White people to stop name calling names is for Negroes to do the same.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Letter from Cornell's L. Paul Jaquith to MLK

L. Paul Jaquith writes Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit to Cornell University. The student body seeks to discuss issues relating to the inequality of opportunities for Negroes in the United States.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Letter from David Segal to MLK

David Segal writes Dr. King enclosing books his wife purchased from the School of Library Services at Columbia University.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to MLK

This is a letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to Dr. King inviting him to be the keynote speaker at a Jewish Seminar on Negro-Jewish relationships.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Letter from Donald Godbey to MLK Regarding Cooperation

In this letter, Donald Godbey offers Dr. King various suggestions on how men and women of all backgrounds can join together in unity.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Letter from Dr. C. O. Simpkins to MLK

Dr. Simpkins writes Dr. King to discuss the actions he has taken to end discrimination in the Dental Society. He expresses that a letter from national leaders like Dr. King would assist him greatly in his endeavors with the American Dental Association.

Letter from Dr. Herzl Ragins to MLK

Dr. Herzl Ragins writes to Dr. King, denouncing him because of his support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Dr. King to Bert Onne

Dr. King commends Bert Onne on the continued support and the accommodations received on his visit to Sweden. He also acknowledges how grateful he is for Onne's work for the Martin Luther King Fund.

Letter from Dr. William G. Anderson to MLK

Dr. William G. Anderson accepts Dr. King's invitation to join the Board of Directors of the SCLC for a three year period.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

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