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Hunger

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A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

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Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly: A Voice for Harlem

Dan Griffin forwards this letter to Dr. King with an enclosure of a magazine from Ave Marie, entitled "A Voice for Harlem." The magazine includes several topics such as hunger in the United States, the War in Vietnam, and worship in the Soviet Union.

Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines

The Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines sponsored, Future Impact, a program to promote economic development for the company. The program also aids in enhancing the skills of the company's black employees.

Discrimination Is a World Wide Issue

Dr. King delivers this address speaking to humanity's failure to offset discrimination. He believes the United States, with all its technological and democratic advances, could stand to learn from the social morality of India, which is considered a "less developed nation." Dr.

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Food and Population Crisis Committee

Dr. David Lubbock and Dr. Jo Alter describe the economic conditions in New Delhi, India. The document lists the operations, communications, medical assistance, food and other things needed to provide relief to the population involved in the crisis.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Letter from Franklin W. Thomas to MLK

Franklin W. Thomas writes to Dr. King to apologize for the delay in honoring his participation in the Hungry Club Forum 20th Anniversary Series.

Letter to Senator Abraham Ribicoff from Earl Whitted Jr.

In this reply to Sen. Ribicoff, Earl Whitted endorses the idea of a guaranteed fixed annual income for the poor, under certain stipulations. It is proposed that a Federal Housing Project area would also provide various economic services to the underprivileged. This program would accomplish education and self-sustainability for those that have been politically and economically disadvantaged.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

This is a draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Handwritten notes are written in the margins to indicate future amendments. Dr. King states that he experiences this moment of acceptance for himself and "those magnificent devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice."

Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Stars for Freedom 1967

This magazine highlights celebrities who have contributed to the Civil Rights Movement as well as the contributions of SCLC and other programs across America. Featured in the article is statement by SCLC President, Dr. King.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

We Have No Government

This is a transcription of a press conference held on behalf of the poor people in Mississippi. Leaders and participants discussed alternatives to government aid to help rectify poverty related concerns.

What Is Man?

This excerpt from Dr. King's book entitled "The Measure of Man" defines the physical and spiritual doctrines of Man. The passage highlights the sinful nature of human beings.

Who Are We?

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.