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Peace movements

Associated Archive Content : 164 results

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

Letter from Sandy F. Ray Regarding "Holy Land Pilgrimage"

Sandy F. Ray, president of Concreta Tours writes a letter sharing the details concerning Dr. King's Holy Land Pilgrimage. She explains that an office representative recently returned from the Middle East "with first hand information regarding tour conditions there." This document includes a report on hotels, roads, inhabitants, and basic information permitting travel to Israel and the West Bank of Jordan.

Letter from Sheldon Rambell to MLK

Sheldon Rambell congratulates Dr. King on the success of the peace demonstrations in New York. He also compliments Dr. King's confidence and strength illustrated through his appearance on CBS.

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

Letter from Sylvia Walters to MLK

Sylvia Walter writes Dr. King commending him on his strong statements and expresses that he has given many the strength to continue in fight for civil rights and peace.

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

Letter from Tori Bjerkmann to MLK

Tori Bjerkmann, the editor of PAX magazine, encourages Dr. King to visit Scandinavia for the benefit of the Peace Movement in Norway.

Letter from Toyozo Takata to MLK

Toyozo Takata writes Dr. King thanking him for enduring all negativity when fighting for peace.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from Whitey the Honkey to MLK

The author stresses that Dr. King is a part of the race problem. They offer numerous political suggestions and concludes that Dr. King should simply mind his own personal matters.

Letter from William Welsh to MLK

William Welsh objects to Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) rejection to enter the draft for the Vietnam War. Mr. Welsh asks that if Dr. King agrees with this notion, he should denounce Mr. Clay publicly.

Letter of Holy Land Trip Postponement from MLK to Sandy F. Ray

In this retained copy of his letter to Sandy Ray of Concreta Tours, Dr. King postpones his planned tour of the Holy Land. Dr. King suggests observing the escalating conflict there, along with the strife in Greece, before revisiting further plans for trips to those areas.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Letter to SCLC from Preston Warren

Bucknell University Department of Philosophy Chairman Preston Warren, a supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, reduces his usual $5 contribution to $1 because of his disagreements with Dr. King's stance against the war in Vietnam.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

March for Peace Flyer

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Meet the Press Interview

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

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