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Labor unions

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A Country Called Corporate America

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

A Look To The Future

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

A Tribute to the Organized Labor Movement

The Jewish Labor Committee extends heartfelt gratitude to the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) for twenty-five years of fraternal cooperation.

ABC Letter re Issues and Answers

Peggy Whedon, producer of ABC's "Issues and Answers" program, expresses disappointment that Dr. King may not appear on the show the coming weekend because of a strike.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

The following document lists the members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty.

Constitution and By-Laws of the SCLC, Inc.

The SCLC exhibits its rules and regulations for the stability of the organization in this Constitution and by-laws. SCLC's constitution addresses several organizational related factors including board responsibilities, meetings, membership and chapter development.

Cooperative Production System

G. C. Szmak provides information regarding the problems of labor management, as well as the causes and reasons for the degeneration of the wage compensation method.

Current Magazine

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Lebbano and Mr. Mayle

Dr. King drafts a handwritten response letter. He informs the recipients of his pressing commitment to social justice.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Draft of Statement by MLK on his Involvement With the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Dr. King wishes to clarify his endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. He states that he did not mean to imply that there was a civil rights issue in the "collective bargaining election," but rather that he admires the accomplishments of the labor movement.

Fact Sheet on the Southern Negro Vote

Fact sheet from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference summarizing the registered Negro voters in eleven states of the South for a period ranging from 1947 to 1956

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Flyer

This flyer from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which includes a quotation from Dr. King, encourages membership in the organization.

Invitation from the Negro American Labor Council to MLK

On behalf of the Negro American Labor Council, August Hill invites Dr. King to visit Racine, Wisconsin. He tells Dr. King that they are suffering from problems regarding employment in addition to all of the other inequalities. He also says that their community is not involved and that they need to be concerned about the issues in their society.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Letter from Abe Feinglass to MLK

Abe Feinglass, International Vice-President of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, requests that Dr. King review and comment on the organization's pamphlets.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Letter from Daniel Gallagher to MLK

Daniel Gallagher, manager of Textile Workers Union of America, encloses a check in the amount of $10.00 as a contribution to the SCLC.

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